Roddy Ricch doesn’t want to get caught up in the process of releasing too much music too quickly. The Compton-bred rapper recently revealed he could drop a new album at any time following the chart-topping Please Excuse Me for Being Antisocial, but instead, he’s waiting for the perfect moment to strike.

In a Variety interview published on Wednesday (December 2), the 22-year-old star opened up on his thinking behind creating quality music that reflects his life.

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“The music isn’t gonna be progressive when you’re putting something out every three months, because you ain’t been through nothing; you still feel like how you felt when you [last] dropped the music,” he said. “To me, stuff doesn’t happen in my life every single day. Maybe for some people it does, but my life don’t happen that fast. I have to give myself time to actually go through things so I can speak on it, and have a new understanding of life. It’s not like I make music that’s not my life, so I feel like I need to give my life time to inspire me.”

Top Dawg Entertainment president Punch responded to a tweet about the interview by saluting Roddy for his mindset. As someone who’s worked closely with fellow Compton artist Kendrick Lamar on his way to becoming a global star, he knows a thing or two about what it takes to be successful.

“Wise young man,” he wrote on Twitter.

Punch then responded to a follower saying the process is different for every artist. “I think it really depends on your impact,” he explained. “It’s no general answer that covers everything.”

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Punch isn’t the only one with admiration for him. During a conversation for Rolling Stone on Tuesday (December 1), Future told Roddy that if he had the chance to start his career again, he’d take more time with releasing music — just like he’s doing.

“Man, if I went back to 22, I would slow down, listen more, observe more, instead of moving so fast,” he said. “I like the way you’re taking your time with everything, critiquing the art. I might have missed something that I could’ve painted better, [but] I skipped over and went to the next thing … dropping three mixtapes in three months. Moving too quick.”

Roddy Ricch Is The Featured Honoree In Forbes' 2021 30 Under 30 List That Includes Lil Baby, Doja Cat, G Herbo & More

Elsewhere in the Variety interview, Roddy Ricch talked about focusing on his own thing and not wanting to emulate big names like JAY-Z and Drake.

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“Someone can inspire you musically because music is a sound, but trying to mimic somebody’s career, that’s almost impossible,” he said. “I could never say that I want my career to be like, let’s just say, JAY-Z. Because JAY-Z at 22 … did we even know JAY-Z at 22? I think JAY-Z put his first album out at, what, 27? Even Drake was, what, 24, 23? I don’t even know. I’m 22 coming off two No. 1s. It’s just a different time.

He continued, “It’s like thinking about Michael Jordan, LeBron James and Kobe Bryant — you can’t compare them, because they came up at three different points in time, they had to play against different people, people’s mentality was different. So I just do my own thing, honestly. I can’t say, ‘I want this man’s life,’ or ‘I want this man’s career,’ because that’s envy, and envy is a sin.”