Rick Ross Says Snoop Dogg's "Doggystyle" Inspired "Mastermind" Skits

Rick Ross speaks on the ability his music has to save lives, says he's always been a fan of Jeezy.

In February of this year it was revealed that Rick Ross recruited Bad Boy Records founder Diddy to executive produce his sixth studio album, Mastermind. While speaking on his newly-released LP in various interviews, Ross says he enlisted the help of Diddy to give the album a ‘90s feel.

Ross touched briefly on that particular decade during his recent interview with Elliott Wilson of CRWN, stating that the ‘90s featured “the best classics.” He then cited The Chronic and Doggystyle as two albums he listened to for inspiration for Mastermind.

“That was the era of the best classics,” Ross said. “You know, in the game. From what Dr. Dre was doing on the West Coast to what Diddy was doing on the East and everything in between. So, when I put this album together it’s like when I sat back and I listened to The Chronic and I listened to Doggystyle. I realized every one of Snoop’s records had something in between the record. Not one record just, you know, went from beat to beat…Whatever it was it just added that other side of entertainment and that other side of energy to the product and helped an artist paint that picture, so that’s what I wanted to do.”

Ross later touched on the inclusion of topics concerning street life on his studio albums. According to the Miami rapper, his decision to include aspects of street life in his music stems from the relevance of it.

“Because it’s so relevant. I mean, it’s so relevant today,” he said. “You know what I mean? Where I come from it’s just so relevant. A lot of times I say different things in my music and hopefully it might save a young mothafucka life. On some real shit. From inspiration to just understanding the casualties of this. It’s a lot of highs and lows in this game. You know, which is very familiar in that street life, so that’s what I bring to my music. The highs and the lows.”

Of the 16 tracks featured on Mastermind is “War Ready,” a record which features Jeezy, an artist Ross feuded with in the past. The Maybach Music Group founder previously revealed that both he and Jeezy were able to discuss their issues recently and as a result have recorded a couple of songs together.

Ross commended the Atlanta rapper during his CRWN interview and even revealed that he’s always been a fan of Jeezy.

“I always been a fan of Jeezy. You know, coming from the South and building an empire,” Ross said. “Being self-made is what I like to call it. That’s when you come from where we come from and you make it happen. And he was somebody that made it happen. So, I commend all artists and all dudes that create their ventures and their format.”

In addition to “War Ready,” both Ross and Jeezy reportedly have another record together, one that will be featured on a project from Jeezy. Ross referred to the record as “crazy” during an interview with DJ Envy earlier this month.

CRWN x Rick Ross, Ep. 1: Trayvon Martin, Jay Z and Building MMG from CRWN on Myspace.

RELATED: Rick Ross Details Diddy's "Mastermind" Contributions

30 Comments

  • Anonymous

    White people mad! Haha!! We did it family!!!!

    • Anonymous

      "and hopefully a source of anger and hatred for you and yours." why would you hope that? seems pretty lame

    • Black Pride

      the success of a fellow Black man is a source of pride for my people and hopefully a source of anger and hatred for you and yours.

    • Anonymous

      does Ross break you off a piece of his checks every time he gets paid? Nah i didnt think so.

  • Does Rick Ross Really Have $92 Million In His Checking Account?

    No. What? That wasn't a good enough answer for you? What more do you need to know? You're really gonna make us get into this??? Ughhh. OK fine. Over the last few days we've received a few angry emails and comments from Celebrity Net Worth visitors who believe our estimate for Rick Ross' net worth is way too low. We currently have Mr. Ross at $28 million. Not exactly a pittance, but according to the angry emails, this number should be raised to $92 million. More precisely, they think the number should be raised to $92,153,183.28. Where are people getting this number? None other than Ricky Rozay himself! Here's what's going on On March 3, 2014, Rick Ross released his sixth studio album "Mastermind". The third track of the album is called "Drug Dealers Dream". Not to be picky, but the word "Dealers" in that song title should technically be "Dealer's". That's a possessive noun. This track starts out with an audio recording of one of those automated voices reading a bank checking account balance. The automated voice dryly states: "Please hold while I locate your information. Your checking account balance is $92,153,183.28. This reflects the most current information available on your account." Clearly the implication here is that Rick Ross called up his bank, selected the option to check his account balance and then recorded the results. All $92 million worth of results. But is this possible? Could Rick Ross really have this much money sitting in checking? Is he following the Floyd Mayweather savings and investment plan? (A few months back, Floyd Mayweather showed a reporter his ATM receipt that had a checking account balance of $125 million.) Or is this just a run-of-the-mill rapper exaggeration? First off, if somehow this brag is true, keeping $92 million in a checking account would be a colossally stupid way to allocate money. Checking accounts might AT MOST earn around 0.50% interest nowadays. The national average is probably closer to 0.10%. Splitting the difference, Rick would be earning just $184,000 in interest per year off his massive wealth. That's not nothing, but as any basic financial planner would explain, taking the money out of checking and putting it into mutual funds, ETFs, maybe a few stocks, should conservatively be able to yield a 5% rate. That would bring Mr. Ross $4.6 million a year from interest alone. If he got lucky with the right hedge fund, Rick might be looking at $10-$15 million. The second big problem with keeping that much money in checking is the fact that only $500,000 is insured by the FDIC. If Rick's bank goes under, which as well know isn't exactly impossible nowadays, Rick's money would evaporate overnight without any recourse. Ok so we've established that keeping $92 million in checking is clearly a bad idea. The more important question is whether or not Rick Ross actually has $92 million in the first place. Our current estimation of Rick's net worth is $28 million. That number might go up in a few weeks when we release our annual list of the richest rappers on the planet, but we're talking about a bump of maybe $5-6 million. Definitely not $62 million. Don't trust us? Well according to Forbes, which we think is a little too conservative with their estimates, Rick earned $6 million in 2012 and $9 million in 2013. That's a grand total of $15 million during what were arguably Rick's peak earning years to date. Let's also keep in mind that in order to have a checking account balance of $92 million, Rick would conceivably needed to earn a little less than twice that amount before taxes. And that's before he spent a dime on cars, jewelry, houses, private jets, vacations and biggest expense of them all for Rick: Food. Even if Rick was the most penny-pinching saver in the world, we're still talking about $200-$250 million in earnings over the last 3-4 years, in order to be left with such a gargantuan bank account. Unfortunately, this isn't reality. Even for Mr. Maybach Music himself. In conclusion, it's pretty safe to say that this is simply one rapper making an extremely over-exaggerated brag.

  • Anonymous

    this guys does nothing original

  • Anonymous

    Mastermind finds him slipping from character into caricature. When hes not falling flat on bad puns, hes busy hawking his Wingstop restaurants lemon pepper chicken wings. When Masterminds not clinging to famous friends, its thrashing at 90s classics for direction. Hes badly in need of reinvention after running out of recipes for his gangster shtick, but hes too set in his ways to change direction six albums in. the moments where Mastermind gives us William Roberts the man instead of Rick Ross the gangster flick composite character with the borrowed name are scarce, and he remains committed to dialing in good life platitudes that increasingly ring hollow. Mastermind finds Ross at a Truman Show moment: his characters reached the logical end of its universe. Going forward, he can either break out or keep up a jig he knows that we know is way past expired.

  • Rozay O'Donnell

    "Rick Ross speaks on the ability his music has to save lives, says he's always been a fan of Jeezy" This is especially true in my case. This humble, giving man took me off the streets of Carol City, FL where I had nothing to eat and nowhere to eat or work,. I had just lost my job working at Wendy's and took residence at a shelter. Rick Ross was holding a songwriting contest in his area; the prize was a signed ghostwriting deal worth one million dollars. I decided to enter just on a whim, but I figured I wouldn't win. So I wrote some lyrics, mailed in my entry, and waited. A week later, the winner of the contest was announced on 106 & Park and I was absolutely floored. The next day was also startling. I was eating soup in the kitchen when one of the staff told me I had a visitor; it was Rick Ross. He simply said "Come with me" and I was speechless. So we drove off to the studio in Miami, where we recorded Port of Miami, and the rest is history. From that day forward, I became Rick Ross' most trusted ghostwriter & closest confidante, and the rest is history.

  • brollya

    yo them skits are nothin like doggystyle.... doggystyle skits made sense and were like a movie... only thing ross did was watch his shooting on the news over and over and put it on cd.... this nigga gettin wacker and wacker everyday.... if anything the shooting was like that tupac me against the world album wen it came on tellin bout how he got shot but he only rain into a building

  • Anonymous

    "Mastermind" is an incredibly apt name for the sixth Rick Ross album. It's the name of a famous and long-running British quiz show where a brainy contestant sits on a black leather chair for a couple of minutes and is interrogated by the host on their chosen subject of knowledge. Once you've listened to this album a few times, you start to see that Ross, rather than create anything new, is effectively talking about his "chosen subject" for over an hour and dragging in anything/anyone within earshot to help him. He throws around Tupac quotes, Wu choruses, does a Biggie impression and trades bars with a guest list that goes into double digits. It may not be particularly original, but bizarrely enough, "Mastermind" ends up being arguably the best album of his career. The problem is that it's probably a couple of years too late. "God Forgives, I Don't" was an instantly forgettable, overblown waste of time that sapped the steam from Ross' impressive career arc. In an ideal world, "Mastermind" would have been his fifth - a long play with no real singles, consistently excellent production, catchy choruses aplenty and surprisingly little filler. It's clearly designed to garner your respect, and as long as you don't analyse it too deeply, it should succeed. Dig a little deeper (than rap), and the weak points of the entire Rick Ross propaganda story surface once again - it's just that in 2014, his stubborn refusal to go away and decent level of artistry/lyricism mean that his audience is far more forgiving than it used to be. To put it another way, since 50 Cent's last meaningful work ("Curtis" in 2007), Rick Ross has released five albums, with every one finding his target audience and selling healthily too (assuming this one doesn't buck the trend). A promising first track ("Rich Is Gangsta") would ordinarily lead into a gigantic single, but such a song simply doesn't exist on "Mastermind" - so instead we get a surreal double whammy of an imaginary "Drug Dealer Dreams" and Biggie homage/rip-off "Nobody". The latter initially has you yearning for Gorilla Black to make a comeback as Rick's impression seems rather lacklustre, but it does grow after a while. Still, there is no substitute for originality and the clear lifting doesn't ultimately do Ross many favours. The prerequisite Jay Z duet is decent enough, but is followed by the superb "Mafia Music III" - featuring a perfect instrumental from Bink! alongside a brilliant assist through the mighty Mavado. Ironically enough, it's the kind of beat you could actually imagine a modern day Biggie Smalls rhyming over, but Ross doing Ross straight nails it. Apparently the MMG head honcho and Young Jeezy had issues (seriously, after a while you just tune it all out) but they have now "quashed" it. The result is alright but about as noteworthy as their initial beef. French Montana returns to help Ross in his "Hip Hop Karaoke" quest to go all ODB over "What A Shame"; the strange combination of fake cocaine dealer Rick Ross with fucking huge cocaine addict Scott Storch on "Supreme" veers into filler territory; "BLK & WHT" fares better, mainly owing to a clever chorus, but Ross doesn't ride the tempo particularly well. After the ladies section (skit + The Weeknd track), the riotously enjoyable Big Sean and Kanye West track "Sanctified" really doesn't need Ross popping up at the end (harsh, but fair). Meek Mill and Lil Wayne help close the standard version of the album off relatively well (even if Ross forlornly asking if "thugs cry" just sounds Razzie-worthy). The deluxe version is, for once, totally worth your money - without ruining any potential surprises for you, just know that Scarface is worth the admission price alone. In the end, your thoughts on "Mastermind" will rely less upon your taste, and more on your stance. I've never been much of a Rick Ross "fan" - I can certainly appreciate his qualities, and various songs/verses have temporarily won me over. This album is surely his most consistent from start to finish, and in that respect it's probably his most enjoyable to date. It's just that the level of fabrication involved in almost every song FOR ME undermines the very foundations upon which his story is based. Putting that to one side, there are clear strengths (beats, hooks, sequencing, no reliance on singles) and obvious weaknesses (certain verses, feeling like a guest on his own album, borrowed subject matter and, ironically, no actual singles). His hardcore army should love it; casual rap fans should find more than a passing interest; and those who only get on board due to big singles will probably barely realise this was even released. Saying all that, you know that "Rating" button in iTunes, where you attribute one to five stars to a song? When push comes to shove, there are only about three songs here that merit that kind of mindshare - and none of those come close to his best singles. By his standards, "Mastermind" is technically a good album, but neither timely nor memorable. Music Vibes: 7 of 10 Lyric Vibes: 6 of 10 TOTAL Vibes: 6.5 of 10

  • So Icy Boi!

    say what you want but Mastermind is the best album of 2014. upon its release, Mastermind received rave reviews from music critics. at Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from music critics, the album received an average score of 92, which indicates "universal acclaim", based on 45 reviews. Rozay has 4 classics already. damn! also, Ross' Deeper Than Rap outsold 50's GRODT, so Ross won the beef. swag

  • Anonymous

    Niggas out here acting like it's cool to drink sparkling wine now. HAHAHAHA

  • Anonymous

    theres original with this guy his always copying others and taking bits from people his like mr potato head he built himself out of bits of other rappers gangsters etc

  • Anonymous

    How you a 43 year old black man with a mohawk?

  • Anonymous

    DANIELLE HARLING FUCKING SUCKS

  • Anonymous

    skits on the album were corny

  • Anonymous

    its fucking crazy how he never breaks carachter and is beliving his own lies

  • Anonymous

    I love how he pushed all his day one niggas to the back burner to sign a bunch of random artists like Wale and Meek that he thought he could make a buck off of. Gunplay 35 years old and still no release date in site for his first album after being his weed carrier for 10+ years. Say what you want about 50 but he put his boys on, they just didn't have the work ethic to prosper for very long.

  • Anonymous

    The MMG business model is built on the idea that if you tell a lie long enough, it will become the truth.

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