Bobby Shmurda sat down for a lengthy interview with HNHH, and openly spoke about his new album, his beliefs on the music industry and how rappers need to remain cautious about their lyrics being used against them in court.

“When I came into the game I didn’t take the music industry serious,” Shmurda began. “I didn’t even really know about the music industry. I didn’t even give a fuck about the music industry when I first came in the game, and then I see how powerful music was, and like how kids really react to it.”

The “Hot N*gga” rapper echoed these sentiments on his IG.

“Go check my interview on why I rather slow grind then hoe grind on @hottnewhiphop and why being in control of you music is important in this time and how I’m taking back control over my career but also why it’s still important very very important working with other companies,” he wrote. “Y’all ain’t going be No stupid lil mf’s on my watch. pimpinnnn.”

 

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Elsewhere Shmurda – who’s no stranger to having his lyrics used against him in court – spoke on the dangers rappers still face despite the passing of the Rap On Trial bill earlier this year.

“Kay Flock, and a lot of rappers are getting locked up right now,” Shmurda said. “So again, they get accused. They getting accused of these things. Accused! Accusations, you know what I’m saying? Theories. Gotta make sure you keep that word, key word.”

He continued, “Now listen, just because they passed the fucking law guys, do not go on the fucking record talking about you just shot Johnny in his face. Please guys, please guys. Do not go saying some dumb shit. But you can express yourself. Express stories better. But don’t do not do anything like, ‘I just shot Johnny in his face.’ Like, what the fuck, bro? Be mindful still, I feel. Still be mindful.”

The Brooklyn lyricist also said his new album, Ready To Live, was due out next month and would feature appearances from Rich the Kid, Rowdy Rebel, 42 Dugg, DaBaby, Meek Mill, and Key Glock among others.

Ready To Live is like where I come from,” he said. “I come from the slums. I see crack, I see drug dealers. I see pregnant people when they 13, twelve. Ratchet shit all day, so just coming outside ready to live to finally get some breathe.”

Watch the full interview below.