Lord Jamar Says White Rappers Are Guests In Hip Hop

Lord Jamar criticizes Macklemore for pushing an equal rights agenda, feels rap is gay friendly.

Brand Nubian rapper Lord Jamar offered up a few bold statements about race and homophobia in Hip Hop during a recent interview with Vlad TV as he brought up the likes of Macklemore and Queens emcee Action Bronson.

In his mild diatribe, which stemmed from the New York rapper being questioned about Macklemore’s “Same Love” record, Lord Jamar went on to refer to white rappers as guests in Hip Hop and criticized those he feels have overstepped their boundaries as guests.

“Okay, white rappers, you’re coming to this almost as a guest,” Lord Jamar announced. “Okay, matter of fact you are guests in the house of Hip Hop. Just because you have a hit record doesn’t give you the right as I feel to voice your opinion. White rappers, those of y’all who really studied the culture, that truly love Hip Hop and all that, keep it real with yourself, you know this is a black man’s thing. We started this. This is our shit. We’ve allowed you, those of you who’ve proved your skill and all that, we’ve allowed you to come in and kick your shit, make yourself known. You know what I mean? And if you have enough respect for the culture we fuck with you. But don’t push it too far.”

With records like “Punks Jump Up To Get Beat Down,” a record in which Lord Jamar raps, “Did you want some more? I didn't think so/Just got whipped like a faggot in the clink,” the rapper has defended his use of the gay slur “faggot” on numerous occasions. Despite the rapper’s past use of the word, he does feel that Hip Hop is in fact gay friendly.

Shortly after declaring Hip Hop gay friendly, Lord Jamar went on to criticize Macklemore for pushing an agenda in a genre he feels the Seattle wordsmith isn’t a part of. His comments were made in reference to Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’ “Same Love,” a song that addresses same-sex marriage, as well as Macklemore’s continued push for equal rights.

“Yeah, I say rap is gay friendly…Making a song like that is like feeling that you have the same footing as any other Hip Hop artist and to me you don’t,” Lord Jamar revealed. “You don’t. Like I can’t go to somebody else’s house and even though they let me wear their clothes and eat their food, that’s not my house. That’s their house. And I can’t get so comfortable in their house that I feel like I can now start talking house politics…To me when people like Macklemore come out with songs like that, I know he loves Hip Hop and all that, but he’s trying to push an agenda that him as a white man feels is acceptable.”

Most recently, Lord Jamar drew attention after releasing “Lift Up Your Skirt,” a diss record aimed at fellow rapper Kanye West. On the song, Lord Jamar refers to ‘Ye as “half a fag” as he spits, "Somebody mad at my hashtag/Instagram black man, lookin' half a fag.”

RELATED: Lord Jamar Defines "Devil," Explains Use Of "Faggot" On "Punks Jump Up To Get Beat Down"

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574 Comments

  • tededfred

    this argument might have some validity if was coming from an MC that wasn't wack. The only reason anybody has even heard of Lord Jamar is because he lucked out being in a group with Grand Puba and Sadat X, two considerably gifted rhyme sayers. So white rappers like MCA,El-P, R.A.The Rugged Man, guys who were/are grinding for decades out of love for the art form are GUESTS in hip hop? Kill that noise. Oh, you know what else those three aforementioned MCs have in common other than the colour of their skin? They are/were all way more skilled on the mic than Lord Jamar could ever dream of being.

  • shafiq

    The greatest rapper alive is white??? you must be out of your mind to think that. there is no white rapper that is the greatest rapper ever not even close.do your history on hiphop.

  • shafiq Abdul-khaliq

    I love Lord Jamal. One of my favorite MC'S

  • whocares

    I guess this guy doesn't know who buys the most hip-hop albums these days.. Taking the approach of saying we created hip hop whites are guests. A white man created Basketball.. This dude is just ignorant just like all racists are!

  • Anonymous

    Needs to take his guestism to the bodega and grab himself some tissues--- Wipe your feet at the door Jamar

  • Kevin Jobson

    Racism isn't going to die until we cut the lines of demarkation between our cultures, just because rap was created by the African American community doesn't mean it belongs exclusively to them, by this idiot's logic Black people are guests in the house of Electricity, running water, infrastructure, democracy and modern medicine. Comon people it's not that hard to think logically, humanity cannot evolve until we learn to look past things as trivial as socio economic background and skin color.

  • Anono

    So if white rappers have a hit record and they are not supposed to have the right to voice their opinion, who gave "Lord Jamar" the "right" to open his fucking piehole? He doesn't have any hit records; even in the 80's he was still a nobody! Vanilla Ice's wack records probably outsold him and I'm not even making this a race issue, just making a point. Jamar give it a rest. Go apply at a local McDonald's, what fame you thought that you had has been long over with.

  • Fuck Jamar

    Oh, white people are guests in the house of hip-hop? So does that mean Tiger Woods is a guest in the game of golf, and Obama is a guest in the house of presidency? You stupid ass lame, who the fuck is "Lord Jamar" anyways? Ignorant motherfucker. Trying to make some pretty bold statements to gain some publicity because Lord Jamar is a nobody. End of rant haha

  • Joseph

    I thought 2pac still reigned as champ of this rap shit.

  • Nomous

    Jamar is totally right.

  • Anonymous

    http://i.imgur.com/Tr8RXeP.jpg

  • Anonymous

    Funny how the greatest rapper EVER is white... Damn that's a slap in the face Jamar how you feel now?

  • TheDude

    This nigga a guest in Slim Shady's house

  • cc

    punk ass, Lord jamal, lord of ignorant bastards.

  • Anonymous

    i'm white and maclemore is a piece of shit

  • LordJamarsAfuckingBigot

    What a piece of shit. Hes the fucking phife dawg of brand nubian along for the ride. Talking about a guest. Pat Robertson of Hip-Hop. I cant believe this homo is from fucking city wow

  • ChronicKane

    The only thing I agree with is the difference between rap & hip hop and separating them. When people ask me if i'm a rapper, i say no, i'm a hip hop artist. The rest is whack though.

  • ZEEKNOWLEDGE

    YO! LJ, I think your bigotry is confusing you brother. Sadly, I see alot of racism coming at cats based only on their light skin-tone or even their style. Racism is poison coming from any man. This saddens me as a member of the Zulu Nation in particular. Maybe you ought sit down with Bam, and have him explain a few things to you, or sit down and watch Style Wars, and refresh your memory. I'm sure you won't recognized your flaws, because of the weight of the narrative you have sold and bought yourself. I assure you that if you wish to remain relevant, there are better ways to go about it. Peace Akhi

  • Norey Kadense

    The context of Jamar's statement is off putting, yet I understand. As a bi, black male from Chicago I believe his, and many other blacks beliefs on the subject is as follows: Hiphop was born out the expression of deeply rooted emotion to mitigate the pain of our unique situations (unique as being the majority of the suffering class) and lift our spirits. Like all music, it's an outward form of your soul. Once it became adopted by other cultures, even those who come from a ethnic group who had(s) historic qualms with even considering blacks as humans, it creates a sense of "lacking cultural respect" when it's used as "yet another tool" to help influence the masses by individuals who are already empowered in controlling the global masses. Basically, we master the world and the universe, so give me your shit too, is the feeling. The homophobic views however I'm guessing is based out of the subservient history which has destroyed our peoples self image and Lord Jamar wanting to abstain himself and his music from this consistently pushed image of the black people. Hopefully he'll one day learn that sexuality has nothing to do with being strong, especially mentally.

    • FlipTheScript

      I'd love to see such a touching and sypathetic explanation written in defence of some white bigots. Two faced angels of morality disrupt reality

    • Norey Kadense

      I personally have issues with the mass promotion of Macklemore since there is an strong overtone of "The White Man's Burden" mentality along with heavily loaded socio-political messages this earlier in his career. Even the "This Is The Moment" music video with the Cro-Magnon man coming out the cave and passing Macklemore the torch was obvious where his vision is. I can't help but feel this is a ruse to broadcast a message of "white people are going to save humanity and the future of the globe!". Hiphop and rap's lyrical content was purposely savaged for 20+ years by these same labels that now promote white rappers as the second coming of Christ.

  • kemji

    Lord Jamar is 100% correct....but america doesnt like to hear the harsh truths about itself.black people have been messed up in US,so you think they wont want to CLAIM something they are very good at and dominate? think again. besides, i hate Macklemore coming into rap like he has authority to change its philosophy and he doesnt.just remember that 99% of the countries with gay marriage are white. why?

    • LordJamarIsTheBlindKKK

      Lord Jamar is the Phife Dawg of Brand Nubian, Yelawolfs talent far outweighs Lord Jamar. If anybodys a guest in hip hop its him. Hes lucky solo artists we're rare in his day or he'd be your moms accountant right now

  • GodlessGOD

    I think Jamar is dead wrong for saying white rappers don't have the right to voice their opinions. Shawn Lov broke down Jamar's comments best I thought.

  • Beast Coast BUCKNASTY

    Whack-lemore is shot as shit, true, but this is just an opinion of a racist rapper with a fucked up mind set. I'm white, I been spitting for years all in the East from East Meadow to Flushing to CT, cyphered wit mad heads, all colours...face it, we all humans, and yes from all different ethnic backrounds, but that 'aint the measure of a man. If you with it, you with it, and the realest WILL recognize who is and who isn't. In the hip hop culture I don't think that race should matter. Dude call himself a Lord, acts flawless, and claims hip hop's his house...fuck outta here

  • TheMASS

    Just watched the Shawn Lov response to Lord Jamar saying White Rappers are Guests in Hip-Hop... I think Jamar and those who share his opinion should take note. Link: http://YouTube.com/watch?v=3p1sUkqjXcc

  • D Prince

    Oh and I love all my gay and lesbian friends. They are the biz! We have lots of fun even though I'm hetero they don't force their way of life on me. I feel that rappers are forcing what those in power want us to know. Get it together rappers! Music and words are powerful! U know this!

  • D Prince

    I'm not racist or homophobic but I'm not blind nor am I stupid. Lord Jamar kept it 1000% even though his choice of wording may be questionable to some he's absolutely right. I won't eeeeven go back to the history of America (the "guest" comment can go deeper .. but we all know history). I, for one love Eminem though (Criminal). Dude could be orange an I'd listen to him. The issue I do have with HipHop these days stems from the messages most rappers (all races) are pushing to our communities. HipHop was founded on truth and struggle but today "Rap" has diluted the real messages that we need to hear. I can't imagine the next 10 years what our world will be like if rappers don't take their platform and stop talking about money, drugs and anything that is personal choice and change their mindsets to talk about what's really going on. Look at Chicago and Detroit youth. Look at some of these grand parents out here "riding around here gettin' it". We don't even have to talk abt the lack of parenting which the powers that be know so they position you rappers as pawns. You guys aren't stupid because I've been around numerous studios with major rappers who have a different conversation off camera. You rappers (white or black) are part of the problem. The "good people" who created martial law totally love u! Ur feeding our people garbage & we're putting garbage back into our communities. Y'all get money now but when the ships come in you better have Bill Gates money or you'll be right here w us. Whether u like or not ur role models and the messages u feed millions of people need to be changed. Lord Jamar I respect u being honest unlike all the other (and I do me all) blk rappers who reviewed ur video. U can tell they think "Bad PR" verses what is the message being portrayed to the people. Don't stand up for your beliefs rappers and definitely don't let the masses know what ur conversations are like off camera. Continue "bleeding" u might as well be "girls" ijs. Y'all all looked week except Ra and Ritz. What a shame!? Y'all definitely don't know your history. S/O all the rappers who actually think about the message they are forcing on people. No wonder there's so many lesbians these days .. many forced .. some not .. trendy huh? Everybody's doing it! YOLO!! FOH!! No shun to those who weren't turned out or do it for trend purposes. I just wish people would realize how phony everything is these days. We're in the damn Matrix. Who's going to be "Neo"?

    • Norey Kadense

      True comment on the people are gay just because it's the "cool thing to do". They're many people who were beat (by parents, siblings, community) when they were shorties just because they where "soft" . This "trendsexual" movement undermines people who had those experiences in real time, and it wasn't from being turnt out by rape or suggestion.

  • eggtree

    lmao so is basketball a white man's thing that blacks are guests at? cause a white canadian invented basketball and it was played only by whites for years before they let blacks play. so should blacks not have a voice in the NBA? lmao this dude is homophobic and racist

  • mike

    KEEP SPEAKING THE TRUTH LORD JAMAR ANYONE THAT DONT LIKE IT CAN EAT A DICK PERIOD

  • mike

    HE IS RIGHT HIP HOP IS BLACK THING FUCK WHAT U HEARD NIGGAS ALWAYS WANT TO INCLUDE THE WHITE MAN IN EVERYTHING WE DO BUT HE DONT WANT US IN HIS NEIGHBORHOODS IN HIS STORES OR KNOW WHERE NEAR HIM UNLESS HE MAKEING MONEY OFF US PERIOD LOL NIGGAS ARE SO STUPID AT TIMES

    • Mike Rode Shortbus

      LMAO, 3 year olds have better grammar and spelling than you haha! When you say so stupid at times, I can only imagine you were talking about yourself. Just some advice, graduate from elementary school, before you post comments on the internet,then you won't make yourself publicly look like an idiot. Do you use 2 hands to write with a pencil too? haha

  • Josh Powers

    Lord Jamar, I bet it's hard to lose relevancy in the fast moving world. You're forgetting that rock was born from the blues. Are white people only guests in rock'n'roll too? When did your career go to such shit that you have to be dug out of obscurity by a bigoted tirade against a superior rapper just to get attention? I am addressing you directly because I know that your punk ass has nothing better to do than read this shit. -JP

  • Shiloh

    ok first off Fuck Lord Jamar, dude hasnt been current in years. this cat wants to come out saying that hip hop is a "black mans thing" motherfucker please, just because it has deep roots in black culture doesnt give you a monopoly on all things hip hop. and how are you going to call out Macklemore for his agenda? just because he fights for equal rights doesnt mean he is pushing a "white mans" agenda. let me call YOU out "Lord Jamar". i call you a racist and say you are biased towards homosexuals. you cant say your cool with equal rights then call someone a fag it doesnt work that way, thats like me saying I am cool with black people then dropping the ER n-word. the same prejudice you are preaching is exactly what Martin Luther King jr and Malcom X were fighting against, your a bigot and a Bitch and so far under-evolved that you should remove yourself and your way of thinking from our entire gene pool as a human race. do us all a favor and don't reproduce, we will be just fine without you spreading your hate and intolerance further.

  • John

    By ours, I mean anyone of any race that can use their brain and body to come together and celebrate life through hip hop culture. No more race bullshit at all. It's ours now Jamar and you know it. That's why you're so desperate in interview, give it up.

  • John

    I like how he acts like he has the clout do shut someone out of hip hop. Usually gods have power and influence... Jamar would get trampled by a sold out crowd at MSG theatre all three nights that Mack is in NY if he showed up to tell him he's not allowed to rap in NY. So whatcha gonna do Jamal? Is the only influence you have in hip hop culture left a YouTube channel? Hip hop is ours now. All ours. Now we choose to include all races and frames of mind, as hip hop is WORLD wide in 2013. We don't include people who claim consciousness and deliver mindless nonsense. Maybe that why you haven't been relevant since 1991 or so.

    • Me

      White people will always support their own. Thats the only reason mack is hot in the first place. As much as white people hate to hear it, Hip Hop culture is black culture. It's a black artform. Made about black life and aimed at black people. White rappers exist because of white rap fans. And i think that's cool. But that's also why i kinda feel this guys message

  • HALL

    I really like Brand Nubian, but Lord Jamar is talking out off his ass. Hip hop is not about race at all. Get the fuck outta here.

  • room2roam

    white people have been a part of hip hop since shortly after its inception. he might have some issues with white ppl

  • Anonymous

    a lot of white people and faggots supporting maklemore here hip hop is black fact peace to the Gods lord Jamar

  • ribeyesteak

    I have to agree with realness' statement. If Lord Jamar wants to put himself at the front door of the house of hip hop as a self-appointed gatekeeper, he has to remember that when entering a castle the first person you see at the front door is the servant/doorman/butler/coat boy. And they treat the guests with respect and class. There are gay people in the zulu nation (DJ Jazzy Joyce being one) so unless Jamar wants to get fired from his position as doorman, he needs to keep his young ignorant mouth shut before macklemore gets that job and Jamar is banned from the house.

  • realness

    If there is such a thing as a house of hip hop, Lord Jamar is the man at the door responsible for taking macklemores coat and hanging it up and filling his champagne glass when it runs low. That's where Jamar fits into the house of hip hop. he's the coat-boy responsible for treating the "guests" with respect. That is the position Jamar put himself in. Until he makes an effort to be more relevant than making homophobic and racist statements, that's where he remains. As a "coat-boy" for the guests.

  • John

    Lets just say he was the guest at Electra records in 1990 or whatever. Mack didn't ask for anyone's approval to spread his art for him the way Jamal needed... I guess that's what you get when you ask an old ass man about the world now... You get the opinion he formed when he was a kid 40 years ago

  • John

    Wonder if he's mad that rich white men own the last relevant music he made 20 years ago... Had white money fueling the only fame he got... While macklemore built everything he has with his own two hands. If anyone is a white man sellout it seems to be The Lord...

  • Jose

    This guy is a racist, point blank.

  • Anonymous

    Justin Timberlake Ft. Drake FREE DOWNLOAD @ http://bigblogtalk.com/songsoftheweek DOWNLOAD MANY MORE SONGS AS WELL! SPREAD THE WORD AND SHOW SOME LOVE #NWTS

  • Anonymous

    LoL! I guess you must be a guest when you drive a car that was invented by a white man, I guess you a guest when they play ur jam on the radio invented by white man, I guess u iz a guest when they take ur picture on a camera invented by white man, bitch. Also you sell Cd's and MP3s invented by white man! So everything about you makes you a guest in this life.

    • readmore

      @room2roam Embarrassing how you got that wrong while being so pompous. Anonymous sounds like a jerk, but happened to be correct about who invented what. The modern vehicle was invented by Benz unless you want to get real obscure and go for Verbiest. Radio, lots of ppl leading to Marconi(bit of an argument there). First still image, Niepce. First recording Scott de Martinville, Russel the CD, some german company the MP3. So...yeah. Also, hip hop a black only club? I'm not white but the first modern music I ever liked was the Beastie Boys.

    • room2roam

      the majority of the things you mentioned were not invented by white men. maybe try reading more?

  • Anonymous

    TRUE THAT LORD JAMAR

  • Karl Bonner

    Go fuck yourself Lord Jamar. Just because you're a Brand Nubian legend doesn't give you authority on these kind of issues. Macklemore isn't pushing the gay agenda, he's pushing his own conscience on the issue. NONE OF YOUR RECORDS IN MY DJ SET, and I will refuse all requests to play your shit!

  • EnerJay

    Okay, so I've been a "guest" in hiphop for 30+ years and I have no desire of "checking out" so get used it.

  • segwick ave., so. bronx

    there is only one race... the human race. and the earth is GODS house which we are all the guests. claiming hip hop and any accomplishments of your own is claiming GODS work as your own and you will suffer the consequences... as lord jamars broke ass is suffering right now. as the culture is suffering... very simple. all races committed atrocities and to hold something over someones head who had ZERO involvement in said atrocities is pure ignorance... the trail to hate and racism. our mothers and fathers who sacrificed their lives for equality would be embarrassed by these snakes who preach false truth in the name of light. lord jamar you are the enemy of the black man and the human race.

  • JohnnyACE GRAND MASTER SEN$Ei {{-_-}}

    If rappers were more like Lord Jamar from Brand Nubian, hip-hop would be in a MUCH better state of affairs. {{-_-}}

  • John Simms

    Fuck you and your talentless noise, Lord Jamar. Real black music is blues, jazz, etc. All of that good stuff like Howlin' Wolf and Wes Montgomery. Not this talentless noise where people warp their voices to sound cool. That's not singing. Even though screaming isn't singing, at least it takes a full year to master without hurting yourself. Frankly though, I enjoy singing more than harsh vocalization. It doesn't take a genius to make up good rhymes. Most rock lyrics are built around rhymes. Going "yadda, yadda, yadda, I gotta, gotta, gotta..." with someone else's work isn't talent. I would be more inclined to accept rap as a style of music if the musicians used "real" instruments to write the "beats", instead of synthesizers, which are still good in their own right. Synthesizers and music in general, as well as black people, are disrespected by this talentless atrocity that is allowed to be called, "music", when in reality, it's just noise. I really wish more rappers would sing instead of talk. Yeah, that might not make it rapping anymore, but what're you gonna do? At the very least, they could sing during the chorus. Maybe then I would be more inclined to accept rap as a "real" style of music, and not just the talentless noise and senseless hollywood-gangbanging that it is. News Flash! People who live in ghettos are not rich! They're usually impoverished. We should get them more help so they become upstanding members of society instead of talentless talkers who lazy their way into making money. Play music because you like it, not because you want money. They're are many more reasons I could give to support my distaste for ther utter talentless noise that is rap, like their dumb, senseless stage names, but I'm pretty sure I've already made my point here. Thanks for listening, people.

    • @John Simms

      did you come here to give your opinion about the article or did u come here to go on a bitchy tirade about how much u dislike hip hop?

    • Anonymous

      ^^^so what you're essentially saying is being gay or touching right rights is something "fake"? theres nothing real or admirable that u can say about gays having the same rights as everyone else and being treated fairly the same as everyone else? being "real" is ALL about coming from the hood/streets? your logic is flawed.

    • TripleSeven

      You ain't know nothing about hip-hop. If rapper started to sing it wouldn't be called rapping anymore 'cus rapping is a melorecitation, poetry etc. If you really think that rock songs have the same type of lyrics, then you must be dumb or you have never heard about internal rhymes, methaphores and other stuff. I'm a white man, but I can agree with Lord Jamar in some cases. He's right saying that pussies like Macklemore are trying to make "being homo" as a normal thing. Hip-hop ain't never been about being homo 'cus rappers were real back in the day and they were talkin' about real shit.

  • s77777777

    so what about puerto-ricans like big pun?????????????????

  • def

    Maybe I'm wrong but didn't Dante Ross - A WHITE MAN - put these dudes on? Wasn't he the one who got them signed to Tommy Boy? He a guest too?

  • Anonymous

    More racism in Hip-Hop. Thanks Lord Jamar.

  • Tupac Shakur

    IF YOU ARE BLACK AND READING THIS....PLEASE LISTEN. THIS IS A TEST. THEY ARE TRYING TO STEAL OUR CULTURE FROM US. THE SAME WAY THEY HAVE STOLEN YOUR HISTORY. THEY HAVE STOLEN YOUR IDENTITY. THEY HAVE STOLEN YOUR RELIGION. THEY ARE STEALING YOUR LAND. WHO ARE YOU? DO YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE? DO YOU KNOW WHERE WE COME FROM? DO YOU KNOW WE ARE AFRICAN? WE ARE AFRICANS TRAPPED INSIDE OF A EUROPEAN CULTURAL CONTAINER. LEARN OUR STORY. WE RULED THE WORLD FOR THOUSANDS UPON THOUSANDS OF YEARS BEFORE THE WAS EVEN A EUROPEAN IN IT. STUDY EGYPT. STUDY THE EMPIRES OF MALI, SONGHAY, GHANA. STUDY NUBIA. NILE VALLEY CIVILIZATION. WE INTRODUCED SCIENCE, MATH, ASTRONOMY, ARCHITECTURE, WRITTEN LANGUAGE, AGRICULTURE, RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY, PHILOSOPHY, MEDICINE TO THE WORLD. They have tried to destroy you. Wake up African man. Learn your history. We are brothers. Pay no attention to those who mislead you. They are liars. Peace.

    • John Simms

      No, as a Celtic Pagan I can tell you that there is no die-hard evidence that any race "ruled" the world before the other, or even existed before the other.

    • TheComedian

      That is the dumbest and funniest thing I have read in a while.

    • Young White Boy

      @bigruffneck If but what a it to see be me at and the was????? lmfao!!! dude go to school or wait a minute ya too poor huh? ohww there there friend

    • bigruffneck

      I'm not sure before i notice them don't steal our African culture that was clear voice lie more effort than do you think they stolen more , huh ? no i don't think so

    • Young White Boy

      Yall invented nothin but picking up my dogs shit and cleaning my toilet friend!

  • HipPOPdx

    I have to space out their names because HHDX won't let me post tem without it saying: "Error Submitting Comment You have been temporarily blocked from posting." Y E S S I R, Y E B O, Ja Rule fanboy, the Drake stan (y o u n g s t a), D E N T A L D A M B O Y, S O I C Y B O I, B E A V I S & B U T T H E A D, B O Y, E y e C o n t r o l, F R E S H 2 D E F, B o b y a h e a d, R I C K Y R O Z A Y, the Anally Pussified Anon Guy (Anonymous & :^) who says "Everything You Say Is BULLSHIT LIES" and "Haha Good Joke", Q u o t e m a n, is the same pathetic fuckface immaturely replying, cosigning and arguing with himself (as other trolls) to look convincing because he is a waste of fucking space in real life. This comment section is a humongous piece of elephant shit now with the same bullshit posts and arguments being made by little ass high school/middle kids everyday. Only very few posters here are legit now. Fuck Generation Z, Alpha, and almost anyone born after 1994. Go the fuck back to your KanyeToThe, LilWayneHQ, Tumblr, HotNewHipHop, WorldStarHipHop, Twitter, OddFututeTalk, TrShady, or any other faggot-like website you came from. Between bullshit TMZ-esque articles and its editors and the retarded "hip hop" stans, it's safe to say that this site (along with much of the Internet and the world) is officially dead and pointless!

  • Kizman

    The streets use to tell us when an album was a classic like illmatic, OBFCL, Ready to Die, Get rich or Die trying. Now you have Hipsters and people who have only been listening to hip hop for 5 years and the so called Hip Hop Nerds, since it's the cool thing now, tell us what is a classic. Some of these people are Hipsters and Hip Hop Nerds and their insight of Hip Hop Culture is through concerts and Laptops from their safe Condos. And might never understand why people in Oakland love E-40, Gucci Mane in Altanta. And don't even have black friends that might give them a real understanding of black culture, so now we have less knowledgeable journalists who have the means and connections writing about Hip Hop. These good old days of the Source and XXL are gone when they got their information from the streets. Not from Hipsters who love East Coast rap and Jay Z, but can never understand a Devin the Dude and Scarface from the South...

  • Anonymous

    WHITE FCUKBOIS B IN RACIST ON THE REG @ THIS SITE NOT A PEEP FROM U HO'S NOTHING NADA A NIGGA SAY SOMETHIN ABOUT WHITEY U FLOOD DA C-SECTION LIKE ANTS WE C IT

  • anonymous

    in a hundred years none of this will matter and you will all be dead and this will be forgotten as a mistake in history

  • IMHOTEP

    You Europeans are so ungrateful. We give you civilization and try to give you a decent sense of HUMANITY... ...and then you wanna go and be all ungrateful and claim it as your own.

  • BLASTMASTER

    You Europeans should be thanking us for civilizing you all. You should be thanking us for giving to you civilization...and TRYING to give you a decent sense of HUMANITY. Don't be ungrateful.

  • F* lj

    What an ignorant statement from a no name trying to make a name. You would never hear from a country singer that black artists like Darius Rucker are guests. Music is music; if anything he should be mad that everyone both white and black (dark and light skinned) are making better music than him. And you wonder why we have race issues? Because idiots like him cant let go. Move on Jamar and go rap to your toilet! Thats about the only thing you are lord of.

  • Kill bill

    Who the f is this. He sucks nobody cares

  • Anonymous

    JA RULE WILL SMACK THIS NO-NAME LO LIFE

  • Young White Boy

    Fuck this Wannabe tree lookin punk i'm a white boy from the burbs and all ya blacks would get fucked out here this dickhead is a racist to whites. he ha ha is wearing a white man sport on his shirt what a welfare monkey bitch this guy is.

  • F*** Lord Jamar

    Who is this dumb ass. all he is doing it making him self look like a fool. Just shows you how much about music he knows about people are all ways trying to change music thats how you keep people liking you. He just needs to shut up and when people know his name then you can talk all this shit you want. stop putting people down that are making in this world unlike Lord "Dumb ASS" Jamar. Funny that he think white people are a quest, white people own BET think about that. NO TIME FOR HATERS WAKE UP AND SMELL THE HIP HOP

  • MC Black Power

    Jamar is preaching the gospel. He got these peckerwood co-opters HOT!!

  • Anonymous

    this is what rascit black man looks like

  • Rayski

    Everybody is talking about white rappers, but here are 2 names that mean more to hip hop than 95% of anybody in the game; Malcom McLaren Rick Rubin

  • SCHWARZ

    IMHOTEP: The only reason why whites are in hip hop is to capitalize and make money. Im reading through the comments on this site and it is clear as day that more than half of the non-black posters are EXTREME RACISTS...trolling a hip hop board. Hip Hop is a Black African culture. Get over it. It is a SPIRITUAL ART FORM, and by that definition it is ANTI-EUROPEAN. HIP HOP IN FACT WAS CREATED AS A COUNTER-CULTURE, AS A POLAR OPPOSITE AND RESPONSE TO EUROPEAN DOMINATION. How dare you white people say that you own any part of it when your calcified pineal glands are not even capable of creating such a thing. The only thing you guys respect is money and nothing EVER CAME FROM THE EUROPEAN MIND THAT DID NOT FACILITATE EUROPEAN DOMINATION. ++++++++++++++++++++++ WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

    • anon

      listen asswhipe, whites arnt trying to say they own hip hop, they are jsut giving there part years later, so saying we cant be part of it is infact racist and a complete contradiction on your culture. haha lord jamar old ass fool trynna stay relevant, macklmore and eminem dont stand for white hip hop faggots. fuck off u racist blacks and whites just get the fuck over it and do your thang

    • John Simms

      Rap was created because people wanted to make money instead of music. Real black music is stuff like Howlin' Wolf and Wes Montgomery.

    • Anonymous

      WHEN DA WHITE FCUKBOIS B IN RACIST MODE U DON'T SAY A WORD TO THEM BLACKMAN SAYS SOMETHING U B STRAININ YO TONSILS GO AWAY

    • Anonymous

      And by dudes, I mean crazy racists such as yourself.

    • Anonymous

      Wow you dudes need help.

  • SeanShake

    just what the game need...more old ass clowns tryna stay relevant

  • Will IV

    1st off, Lord Jamar has not had an even remotely successful or relevant record in nearly 20 years. He's 45 and most likely broke and desperate, which is why he is saying negative things about people far more successful than him. Secondly, no race or ethnicity owns any type of music. ITS MUSIC. Do white people own country music or EDM? No, black people who like or perform these types of music are not guests. White people should not feel like guests in Hip Hop. I personally can't stand when white rappers try to hold back or be overly respectful, just because their afraid of "disrespecting the culture". If you love hip hop music and want to be a part of it, then embrace that and don't hold back. Do you and don't worry if it offends some bigoted, ignorant section of the population.

  • D

    Fucking stupid bigot. So to say that its purely a racially black aspect being hip hop and its 4 elements (MC, B-Boy, Graffiti, DJ) and all the non black members of lets say Rock Steady Crew, Taki's graff (he's Greek) and every other element of hip hop as a CULTURE as he likes to describe he just only other people visiting as opposed to defining the culture of hip hop really makes it easy to accuse him of being a stupid fucking bigot. Hip hop comes from the poor, the project children of the Bronx, Brooklyn and the culture which not only started in NYC but grew and developed across the country and around the world. Graffiti is the most prolific form of art today if you take into consideration that there are hundreds of thousands of artists around the world doing it as we speak. B boying has defined completely new dance styles used in every aspect of pop culture. Poverty (the muse in which hip hop was created IMO) has never been racially biased.... you can get fucked just like the next person and that's the fucking Truth! This man is a small part of hip hop if that. He does not define or regulate a God damn thing about it. And for his outright bigotry towards race, its him being a fucking hater. Also regarding homophobia, its genetically proven that one is born that way. Much like this fukboy's born an ignorant hating asshole. He probably mad that Macklmemore's made more in his heist record than fukboy Jamar's made in his career. Thank you for bringing hip hop, America and the world to the level of low brow bigotry and hatred that Rosa Parks, MLK, the 4 children in Alabama and your parents and grandparents worked so diligently to eradicate from the world we live in. You really know how to fuck up a good thing... maybe now you know why no one was buying your shit. haha!

    • Anonymous

      ^^^but there isnt empircal evident that cleopatra was black and that all of what u said is 100% accurate. the eurocentric account is not all that accurate, but neither is the afro-centric account either. what is needed to settle this is REALIBLE un-biased (meaning no bias towards or in favor of neither euro or afro centric views) material source to get all the facts straight once and for all. someone please set the damn record straight so this bullshit over on a simple ass HIP HOP article can be done with and over

    • Anonymous

      Cleopatra had African blood. WAIT.....YOU ARE BLACK????????? NO WAY!!!! YOU SHOULD GO LEARN YOUR HISTORY AND STOP LEARNING FROM EUROPEANS! I think you are already ashamed G. I didn't do that ha ha. Have some pride in yourself and stop the self hate. I actually researched and learned African history. You should too. Hotep.

    • Anonymous

      Next thing you're going to say is that Cleopatra was black too... I'm done arguing with you honestly, you're so closed-minded that it hurts. It's people like you that make me ashamed to be black sometimes. Stop being an idiot and pull your head out your ass.

    • IMHOTEP

      "They were a light BROWN. Do you understand? They were North African, MOST of whom were the same skin color" LMAO!!! Do you know anything about Kemet? Nile Valley Civilization? Nubia? Ethiopia? Black comes in all shades of colors.. from copper red to brown to blue black. Stop being stupid...I know you're smarter than that. You have a brain right? Use it. Come back to me when you are more educated on the subject so I dont have to waste valuable time explaining basics to you son. Hotep.

    • Anonymous

      See, now you're going around assuming things. This isn't something learned on YouTube. How about you actually learn some real history, instead of closing your mind off to anything that upsets you. I'm not even white, I'm not claiming anything. They were a light BROWN. Do you understand? They were North African, MOST of whom were the same skin color. Now stop crying because you don't want to accept facts.

    • IMHOTEP

      Africans but not black? You're joking right? Im going to take your statement as satire....as comical....I thought we were being serious here.... Stop playing with me boy.

    • Anonymous

      "Yes they were African, but they were not BLACK" Do you know how ridiculous you sound? Do you know anything about Kemet other than what you watched on Youtube? Jesus. Ancient Egypt was a Black African civilization founded by Black Africans in Africa. It was birthed by Nile Valley civilization...from Nubia/Ethiopia. Are you stupid or just completely ignorant of history? You see this is the very reason why we are having this debate...because years from now white people will say they started hip hop...just like Egyptologists are trying to claim ancient Egypt. STOP CLAIMING OUR CULTURE!

    • Anonymous

      Are you serious right now? You're trying to act all intelligent and say "blacks" were the first to invent hieroglyphics... no you are incorrect. But the whites did not either. The ANCIENT EGYPTIANS created hieroglyphics, who were neither black NOR white. Yes they were African, but they were not BLACK. They were a tan, and it's commonly known history. Now stop acting like white people are the only ones who do such things.

    • Will IV

      Haha Race Wars on Message Boards! Imagine how different this conversation would be if we were all debating in person. At the end of the day, music is music. No specific group of people has any inherent ownerships over it. It's always evolving and no matter who, what or where it originated from, anyone on this planet is free to create and be a part of any music they please. And seriously, get over your white devil fixation. You sound the 5 Percent Nation character in Don't Be a Menace.

    • SCHWARZ

      Taking things from the spiritual plane and bring them into the physical word is African, from the African mind, and existed 1000's of years before there was even a European in the world. +++++++++++++++++++++++ DA ILL ETHERIST

    • Anonymous

      "Hip hop comes from the poor, the project children of the Bronx, Brooklyn and the culture which not only started in NYC but grew and developed across the country and around the world" ^ this is true (shoutouts to the Johnsons & Winleys for pressing them records) Hispanics are considered Black so when we say Black, they are automatically included. We stand side by side in these ghetto streets. Asians, we have the ultimate love, they have ALWAYS supported us and RESPECTED the artform. Some of them are BEASTS on the turntables and beatbox and with the B-BOY STYLE. RESPECT. SOME whites always wanna act like if it wasn't for them, rap wouldn't exist. You don't read these boards daily, see them act like they really know wtf is going on and they ain't nowhere close to the action.

    • IMHOTEP

      @Anonymous and you have nothing of value to contribute except laughably false and empty conjectures. Next time say something intelligent.

    • Anonymous

      IMHOTEP You sound like a closet angry gay

    • IMHOTEP

      What exactly did other white people contribute to hip hop outside of their mere participation? Hip hip wasn't created in NYC...it was born there....due to the conditions brought about by European capitalism and domination. It was born in the ghettos that white people created. Study melanin and the pineal glad....then talk to me about B Boying. Thats rhythm...most melanin challenged people have a hard time doing a simple two-step. Graffiti? LOL. We were the 1st to invent written language. Hieroglyphs? Taking things from the spiritual plane and bring them into the physical word is African, from the African mind, and existed 1000's of years before there was even a European in the world. Homosexuality is not genetic. It is cultural. Of European origin...out of Greek/Roman culture. Show me a single case where homosexuality existed in Africa pre-european invasion. You can't. You people have a very warped sense of reality. Respect the architects.

    • Anonymous

      ^ **Big sigh*** More angry white people? All these years I thought maybe this was at least half black.... This site is basically full of white teenagers. Kinda proves Jamar's point. The irony.

  • IMHOTEP

    The only reason why whites are in hip hop is to capitalize and make money. Im reading through the comments on this site and it is clear as day that more than half of the non-black posters are EXTREME RACISTS...trolling a hip hop board. Hip Hop is a Black African culture. Get over it. It is a SPIRITUAL ART FORM, and by that definition it is ANTI-EUROPEAN. HIP HOP IN FACT WAS CREATED AS A COUNTER-CULTURE, AS A POLAR OPPOSITE AND RESPONSE TO EUROPEAN DOMINATION. How dare you white people say that you own any part of it when your calcified pineal glands are not even capable of creating such a thing. The only thing you guys respect is money and nothing EVER CAME FROM THE EUROPEAN MIND THAT DID NOT FACILITATE EUROPEAN DOMINATION. There is no exception. Black people created hip hop, same as Black Africa birthed civilization, all sciences, arts, writing, math, architecture, medicine, spirituality, astrology, and I can go on.....European culture is of domination, murder, homosexuality, aggression, racism, and genocide. Respect your parents and RESPECT THE ARCHITECTS.

    • Anonymous

      one of the most retarded things i have ever read. its clear u are black nationlist revisionist of human history, believing every single afro-centric point of view to be factual. smh

    • John Simms

      Um, as a Celtic Pagan, I can tell you that homosexuality was not accepted in Pagan culture either. I'm of multiple European origins, and possibly Native American. I have dark brown hair and dark green eyes. I'm beautiful in my own way, it doesn't matter if you're black, white, blue, or green. You're obviously a racist with no knowledge of European Bluht Und Boden(blood and soil). Then again, how could you? You're not European, like me. However, as times change, so must beliefs and people. "Religion"(as you christians call it)was not meant to be taken literally. If all people were white with blonde hair and blue eyes, this world would be boring.

    • Anonymous

      Everyone is in hip hop to make money. Its not rocket science. If they weren't then all of their music and shows would be free. Dont be stupid. Im not saying they don't love the culture....no one is saying that. But this is a business now....if you try to tell me these people are in hip hop to uplift black people from European domination then you are delusional. Blaming white people for our problems? Who invaded Egypt/Africa? Who colonized Africa? Who is still there? Who initiated the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade? Who initiated Jim Crow laws? Who pumped drugs into our community? Who ran COINTELPRO? Who killed Oscar Grant? Who controls the wealth in this country? Who controls corporate America? Who killed every aboriginal in Tasmania? Who has either invaded almost every single country in the world if they didnt try to destabilize their governments? Come on brah. Stop. Go listen to KRS One "Blackman in Effect" SIIIIIISSSSSSYYYYYYYYY!!!!!

    • Young bleazy

      try to tell me guys like El-P, The Grouch and Eligh, Brother Ali, Eyedea, Vinnie Paz, Slug, R.A. The Rugged Man, I could go on...are into hip hop to capitalize and make money. All of the above have been doin it since the early 90's and put out some of the dopest shit in hip hop, and are respected by legends of the game. If you're gonna talk about racism look in the mirror first. Keep on blaming white people for all your problems... And listen to KRS One's "Move Ahead" and gain a little knowledge.

    • Anonymous

      .....with a herpes bump on ya lips stumbling to do a 2 step dance

    • IMHOTEP

      and there you go showing your absolute disrespect of culture because you have none. All you want to do is consume and take over. You probably don't even respect your parents. Surprised they haven't kicked you out yet.....

    • Anonymous

      you and the architects can suck my white balls im still gonna listen to hip hop

  • LOLOLOLOLOL

    this clown is the guest in hip hop...the only people knocking brand nubian are a bunch of washed up old heads that were in their prime in the 80s

  • tha OG

    He speaks tha truth!!!

  • C.O.B

    didnt know music had a color its statements like this that make this country progress to nowhere we need to stop labling things by color and start seeing each other as americans thats what we r and if dont were going to die off seperation=elemination fuc this ignorent comment

  • Anonymous

    Ok if it is black music you should only sell that product to black people! and than your hoes your cars your beautifull cribs and all that will disapeear! :)

    • Anonymous

      what point did u prove here? that black rappers made positive songs? they still had to sell and white ppl have always been responsible for most of the records (and are mainly responsible for it alot more nowadays) so if they stop buying, rappers suffer

    • DaMamba

      Just a Friend in that list........

    • Anonymous

      Funny part is when white people were chastising and making fun of it and their politician family were trying to get it banned, the topics and music was WAAAAAYYYYYY better than now, when they're catering to white fans. "The Message" "Problems Of The World Today" "What People Do For Money' "Fight The Power" "Black Steel In The Hour Of Chaos" "Electric Relaxation" "Paid In Full" "World Is Yours" "Hard Knock Life" "Just A Friend" "Love's Gonna Get You" "Will They Reminiscence (T.R.O.Y.)" "I'm Slipping" "We Gonna Make It" "Today Was A Good Day" "On My Way"-Suga Free (I know west music too) Your comment only proves to me that you're the one he's talking about, a guest.

  • Jay

    If there were as many blacks in rock than whites in hip hop , common people... White Rockers would'nt be that nice to black rockers like black rappers are to white rappers. That said, ''Racism is still alive'', from both sides. If one irrellevant ''rapper'' is saying weird shit to get your attention , ignore it. Because you aint better than him if you reply with some racist comments. Hip Hop is about unity fuck the rest.

    • Anonymous

      "white Rockers would'nt be that nice to black rockers like black rappers are to white rappers" what makes u think that? chuck berry and little richard basically invented what would become rock music (and many blues artists are a huge influence to rockers like led zeppelin and the rolling stones), and jimi hendrix (especially when he first blew up on the scene) was accepted more by white ppl than black ppl at that time

  • Top 10 DoA

    10.MGK 9. Jerry Heller 8. Paul Wall 7. Mc Serch 6. Vanilla ice 5. Macklemore 4. Brother Ali 3. Bubba sparx 2. Beastie boys 1. That white boy from Detroit

    • Anonymous

      LOL Search was better than Prime Minister Pete Nice? No Everlast, but rec exec Jerry Heller and not Rick Rubin? Locksmith>>>>>Macklemore

  • no your your own problem don't blame it on others

    fuck off hiphop is a joke people like lil wayne and drake represent you black folks. Your here attacking us white people when your own people kill each other and portray hiphop as nothing but money hoes and cars getting drunk doing drugs. Yet you have to attack us white people to make yourselves feel better about yourselves.

  • FUCK WHITE TRASH

    ALL WHITE TRASH ARE COMMENTING...HEY LORD JAMAR YOU SHOULD EXPLAIN THEM ALSO THAT THEYRE GUESTS TO THE HIP HOP DX SITE ALSO

  • realisticperson

    Ok, and Lord Jamar is a spook and a guest in America. give me a break. That's why he only lasted a few episodes in Oz, lol.

  • Bejnamin

    When you turn the mic on.... everyone is on a level playing field. As a human being you have the right to express your opinion. It doesn't matter who invented basketball, once its game time you gotta dribble.

  • Anonymous

    Loser, trash. Go back to Africa.

  • Anonymous

    this guy is a faggot. never heard of him. Em would destroy this black clown

  • beyonic

    damn so many racist niggas in here....hiphop doesn't care about race...it's world wide, you idiots...greetings from nazi land

    • Anonymous

      ^^so being white would invalidate his actual point? and hes white just because he disagrees with lord jamar? just another moron with nothing of intelligence to say.

    • Anonymous

      ^ that fact you, a white dude, (deny it all you want) type "nigga" on hiphop site behind some bullshit username and think it's fine because "black rappers say it".... This is why I'm voting Lord Jamar for MAYOR!

  • Anonymous

    Like how BLack are guest to whites in the business or political world, were we have to act like them, dress up like them, almost play the part to get ahead, that is how hiphop is period.. Why use black urban words such as dope, homie, crib and etc.. and you come from a more elite suburban neighborhood were most whites pretty much where taught good English... unless urban schools were our vernacular is a little different and it became a culture... not saying Hip HOp is a culture of ignorance.. but it is a culture of neglected relations with counterparts who want to infiltrate and dominate only to have an agenda of create wealth of money for themselves and wealth of hatred for ourselves... no racism it's the truth look at our history with other genres such as ROck N Roll, R&B, Blues and Jazz

  • Kramer

    Ok, thats not racist or anything..

  • Anonymous

    Fuck this racist bitch, Eminem is a fucking hip hop legend!

  • TheGreatPretender

    It's quite an ironic statement. Culture is not formed from race, it is formed from the collective nature of people regardless of race. Why do we have to judge someone on their skin colour? All of us should be way past that. Judge a man on his words and actions. Peace.

    • TheGreatPretender

      And no-one is saying I can't define Hip-Hop as part of my culture. If you are then I will call you a degenerate. The time it takes for fuckwits to spout their shit and to digest that is for a madman. You can proclaim what you like. You and I are made up of the exact same particles. If you still look at someones creed and judge them on that then that is your prerogative. Not for me though and I can't really comprehend the rational thinking behind it.

    • Anonymous

      The great pretender is a white dude., Look bruh, no-one is saying dont like the music - just understand we use music to to fight against injustices... namely white people... and like all other genres when white people get in it dilutes the message. Basically, love to all, we always invent new genres to escape y'all fuckboys ... but oh well!

    • TheGreatPretender

      I understand what you are saying. Everything has its origin and that will be admired and respected when you become part of that culture yourself. That doesn't mean it is segregated to a certain section of society. For me, Hip-Hop (in it's true nature) is about people coming together for enjoyment and a coming together of those that are fighting for their right. Hip-Hop for me is a movement of the people. I think we can agree that all of us are suppressed these days and Hip-Hip (regardless of if you agree with Jamar's sentiment) it has broke down boundaries for many people.

    • Anonymous

      Unfortunately.. Every culture has an ethnic/racial association behind it.. especially if it was cult like and using traditional structures such as African beats and Jamaican rocksteady in HIP HOp..so It is Black culture.. just like Blues, Jazz and R&B

  • KinO

    YYYYUUPPPP...long overdue saying that Lord Jamar. It's the truth....as it was for the R&B, Rock & Roll, Jazz, etc...anything we invent, it gets inflitrated by the usual suspects. Lord Jamar speaks the truth everyone is scared to say.

    • D

      Um, no. Hip hop and its 4 elements (not just rapping) was created by a mixture of cultures and a shit ton of them at that. There were Puerto Ricans, Whites, Blacks, etc. It was started from the influences of reggae, disco (y'all wanna take claim for that shit?), funk, dubbing from blues, rock and so on. It stemmed from urbanized projects in NYC like south Bronx where underfunded massive monolithic building complexes were a place to house the poor. You saying that blacks are distinctly the only poor people in the world that is ONLY effected by poverty? If that's true what the fuck is wrong with you? Ya you don't wanna be a fukboy and talk up to someone who actually can talk shit fukasspunk. Poverty doesn't give a fuck about who poverty hurts... you can get it just like any other race, creed, culture. there is another aspect to hip hop that you're clearly missing (is that shocking?). that of self awareness and showing the reactionary message of failed states and social systems. it was a voice for those who did not have one. but with that voice is a requirement to actually speak the fucking Truth which you clearly are not educated enough to speak from either a racial stand point or that from a hip hop cultural standpoint. National Poverty Center shows that in 2010, 27.4% of blacks in the US live in Poverty (nearly triple that of whites in the US) which shows a clear racial disparity. But take a fucking second to look at that 1 fact! 72.6% of blacks in the US live outside of poverty. That means I have a nearly a 3/4 X to assume that a punk bitch like yourself most likely lived in middle to upper class America and you're talking straight out of your fucking ass. Why is hip hop so universal? Because wherever you go, you can find poor pissed off kids living in ghettos in failed states around the world. They can relate and in doing so help drive this culture which cannot be claimed or racially defined by one group specifically. You're a fucking moron, a racially ignorant one at that. Hip hop DOES NOT DEFINE BLACK CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES NOR AROUND THE WORLD... gangsterism ALSO DOES NOT DEFINE BLACK CULTURE... if it did you would literally be making yourself and your people look like complete racial stereotypes. the positive aspects of black culture are massive and although is a driving force in hip hop, its not distinctly black in its creation. that argument can be made with blues and jazz and those both influenced hip hop greatly, but you cannot state that Taki, DONDI, KEO TC-5, all not black and legends in HIP HOP... do you know what the fuck you're talking about? Nope. Crazy Legz, Kuriaki, Ken Swift.... all founders and innovators of B-boying (it's not chris brown fukface) and all NOT BLACK. you see where your bitch ass theory doesn't come through even the most basic tests? its because hip hop is not about racial divideds. its about those poor kids having a voice, speaking out and being heard on a world stage and being accepted for the culture is diverse and amazing. i know I used some big words here bitch but you shouldn't have a problem digesting what is written because its nearly a 75% chance that you came from at least a mediocre formal education regardless of how you would like to classify your failures... don't put it on black people. there are millions of black people in this country that are succeeding and educating themselves and living the lives they want to live. you are not the representative for black americans and/or hip hop. your just a fucking idiot. welcome to the world bitch.

  • Julie Young

    upto I saw the paycheck 4 $7329, I did not believe that my neighbour woz like they say actualy earning money in their spare time from there labtop.. there uncle has done this for under sixteen months and recently repaid the dept on there condo and bought Renault 4. This Site... www.Fb39.com

  • BGG

    if a white man made these same racist statements it would be all over cnn until his reputation was destroyed and labeled a racist by society. the same should apply to black ppl when they make statements as ignorant as his were.

    • Anonymous

      "Nah that some bullshit from some mixed raced nigga" what does being mixed race nigga got to do with the actual arguement? talk about what hes saying instead of making petty comments about what u think he might be (and btw, being mixed doesnt invalidate what he said). "He sound mad confused. youtube world history - see who's been and still is killing and oppressing who??" i think u are confused. did u not know that chinese ppl have been opposed? did u not know about many of the genicides around the world (armenians, jews, cambodiana)? did u not know the ppl (especially women) of the middle east gets killed all the time to this day? did u do any research outside of your afro-centric bias point of view? hmm, its like you havent. blacks and browns arent the only ones suffering (and havent never been the only ones to suffer). get your facts straight, do real research beyond afrocentric bullshit and learn how to debate instead of making dumbass ad-hominems. boy ppl here need to listen more, talk less

    • Pure Breed

      @ADWT Nah that some bullshit from some mixed raced nigga. He sound mad confused. youtube world history - see who's been and still is killing and oppressing who?? Whats that u say??? Brown people?? Thats fucking right. Look outside you little borders and see murder and rape and pillage global on blacks and browns.

    • BGG

      let that man rap about and bring attention to whatever he want as long as its in a positive light. at least he aint talking about bitch this bitch that fuck this smoke a nigga bang bang shit in his raps like majority of black rappers in hip hop today. he grinded hard to be where he at so quit hating on the man cuz he white. praise him for allowing a ppl to see there is more to hip hop then gangs, drugs, bitches, and crime.

    • Ain'tDownWithThat

      KingO, I think you are misplacing the blame here. The elite will do anything they can if it involves a mass gain of power or wealth for them. To this day that is true. All over the world, in every country there are people who are suppressed by their overlords and they don't care about our nature. Why should I be responsible or even prosecuted by the actions of some evil men? Power to the people.

    • Anonymous

      After everything we've been through we have the right to step up and defend our sh*t.

    • KingO

      yea,yea,yea....and rightfully so....look at US history. Why wouldn't there be a negative reaction towards the usual suspects? Come on now....we didn't start it. They did...Live with it. Stop trying to put a reverse spin to it, like you don't remember the order history happened.

  • gr

    I'm black. I consider myself to be ingrained within the hip-hop culture but the two things are separate. I completely disagree with what Lord Jamar is saying. No one is a "guest" within a culture. You are either a part of the culture or you are not. This stupid, territorial "this is mine" bullshit is ridiculous. You could be any color from any background; if you're in it, you're in it; if not, you're not.

  • Anonymous

    Dammm Lol, when I first seen the pic above I thought my nigga Bun B had caught AIDS or some shit LMAO. Who the fuck is this sick lookin dude?

  • chillthrillz

    and for the sports analogy,,,niggas is right,,, african americans are guest in the white mans organization,,a brother stay getting,,,, fined ,,cut ,,,dropped,,,hurt,,,,etc.....fuck up and watch how those white organization get in that ass,,,,,,same rules apply for hiphop nigga!!!

  • Anonymous

    This nigga is just another example of somebody brainwashed by the Nation smh, fucking racicst biggots.

  • chillthrillz

    white history is full of stories of cultures being destroyed and altered,,,,,,i dont give a fuck how many white boys can rap,,,,,just remember who you got your style from and the reason you do this shit in the first place,,,,,,one minute we the worst thing on earth,,,,,, but some reason motherfuckers love our style,,,,from the best to the worst,,,,

  • chillthrillz

    this rap shit is what it is RAP!!!,,,hiphop the culture is a different thing to those of us that live the lifestyle for real ,,meaning,,,,, love peace unity and a good time,,,,,everything has its reason and the hiphop culture is designed,, 1.tell the truth, 2.enlighten, 3.gain knowledge of self, 4.preserve your nubian ebony bloodline,,5.teach the truth to the young black youth,,,,the powers that control the gate cant get money influencing this design,,,,,,that gay shit is just sex,,,,white boys been loved our style,,,,,,so really what is new,,sometime being to accepting,,,allows for discontent,,,and these half ass rappers of all color get a warped sense of self,,,,,,the people that dis the god are mostly white anyway...so once again nigga you are a guest so shit your ass down when grown folks are talking

  • Niggers are worthless

    Go eat a banana you smelly ape

  • EarthToneDaProducer

    Just sad...

  • Lonnie_Kushking

    and forgot mention, Hip Hop has been global for 20 years.... Rick Rubin is huge as are lots of other white producers and management teams. and black ppl are free to make country, rock, classical, why should Hip Hop and Rap be made by only black ppl or Puerto Rican rappers. And most downloads, CD sales and concert tickets are bought by white teens and 30-50 yr olds. Without colorblind white ppl that want to hear good music, Hip Hop would be like Jazz or RnB sales.

  • Lonnie_Kushking

    Tell this washed-up, Has-been, that yes, Brand Nubian was dope. Without them, there is no Dead Prez or Common.... But, the madness has got to stop. These are his opinions, and he's not the Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton of Hip Hop. Now, if Rakim, Big Daddy Kane, Chuck D, Afrika, Herc, and those legends had a problem with what Jammaar thinks is a problem... maybe we might listen. Grand Pooh was the nicest in the group by far.

  • Zulu

    What a fucking idiot making it a race thing. Just last week or two we had two members of the Wu saying they dont give a fuck about who is gay or not, plus the only two gay dudes I know involved with HipHop are black ie. Frank Ocean and Mr.Cee. I guarantee this dude is the biggest closeted homo in the game, bitter old racist faggot.

  • Come On

    That's the stupidest thing someone can say..for the record that's his and only his opinion not the Hip hop communities, we're trying to say away from type of shit borderline racial shit.

  • stanley

    its true tho that song is shitty and gay macklemore is a shitty white rapper.....lord jamars a bitter on the low sensitive type forefront specialist of gay activities who shouldnt have been put in contact with anything to do with hip hop since nobody listens to brand nubian

  • Johnny Blaze

    so if white people are guests to hip hop, then i guess black people are just guests in the NBA...so by this dumbass dudes logic, Lebron is a guest of the NBA and Eminem is just a guest of the NBA...Fuck no, Lebron is one of the top 5 faces of the NBA and Eminem is in the top 5 faces of rap...and btw bob dylan is the godfather of rap...listen to "subterranean homesick blues". That song was really the first time in music that anybody ever put sentences together that rhymed and were really fast. He was WAAAAY ahead of time both in his style and lyrically, he is top 5 regardless of genre... This guy invented lyrical music. When everybody was just trying to make it on the radio with hit songs about nothing, bob dylan made music that had a message and was insanely lyrical..Thats why i have no problem with Pharrell saying kendrick lamar is the new bob dylan. obviously he isnt up there yet, but they both had similar qualitites

    • Both of you are retards

      STOP POSTING YOUTUBE LINKS AS REFRENCES, AS IF EVERY VIDEO IS PURE FACT. SMH FUCKING IDIOTS

    • dumbfucks

      Kendrick Lamar is far from Bob Dylan and Bob Dylan was in no way the inventor of lyrical music, neither was he the first to put fast rhymes togehter. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zP4jCaBa1so

  • anon

    this dumb ass nigga.....i could only imagine what he got to say about white ppl using the telephone and eating peanut butter...whjo the fuck is this dude anyway?...Action Bronson not even famous and he more known then this clown...lemme guess...he a "legend"...he jus old as fuck and mad he washed up

  • Anonymous

    JA RULE GON SMACK U WHEN HE SEE U!

  • Anonymous

    lord who?? this broke nigga just bitter

  • Anonymous

    Racist person. HIP-HOP is HUMAN thing and started by people from the ghettos. He has no idea about the other parts of the earth, we have HIP-HOP in HUNGARY, and he doesn't know ANYTHING about us, about the feelin' here....maybe he is talkin' about americans, but still shit what he said. Africa Bambaataa was one of the first who created the hip-hop basics with his music, right?! Check this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMVokT5e0zs ! And Henry Chalfant was white, without him the graffiti is not on the same art level, or what about Malcolm McLaren??? Come on, this guy is from the USA, but he is NOT native american, and he is allowed to vote...Just think! PEACE, LOVE, UNITY and HAVING FUN!!!!!

    • this nigga

      @donnie mac,,,,,,,from 76 to 1980 the dreads in brooklyn where crazy/ couldnt bring out a set with no hip-hop / cause the pistols would go bbbrrraakk / so why dont you wise up show all the people in the place that you are wack / instead of tryin to hate on a blog / you need to go in get the fuck off the crack,,,,,,,

    • Bennie Mo

      @donnie mac " nurturing off OUR VITAMINS" Da fuk u talkin bout??? Lol ,lame. Stupid old azz nig@

    • donnis mac

      Hip Hop is a CULTURE, made by people LIKE Jamar. It's AFRIKA Bam........it was KOOL HERC who started it.....Malcolm & Henry???? Shoutout to the SUPREME TEAM BROOKLYN, you were NEVER THERE you in HUNGARY, H U N G R Y, nurturing off OUR VITAMINS What you know about the NYC Zulu representatives in the 8os? Like Jamal said, Y'ALL VISITORS You the PROTOTYPE of what Lord Jamar is saying!

  • Kron

    Rather listen to a white boy with skillz then an irrelevant ass nigga Im jus sayin

    • Kron

      At least I ain't some pussy ass bitch hiding behind anonymous.. and yea fuck my dad..i aint kno the muh fucker...not like how ya kno ya moms pussy inside and out,, jus sayin

    • Anonymous

      yo dad is irrelevant kron jus sayin still wanna listen to that white boy

  • Choc Donut

    Hip Hop is a guest that has overstayed their welcome in the history of real music.

  • Anonymous

    Black peolpe dont play basketball too hard, youre a guest as it was invented by a white man, Jordan please stop dunking from the 3 point line , your'e a guest!

  • Nasstill@it

    This sounds racist to me... and I'm black.

  • Dragon Gate King

    So.... is Lord Jamar the new Benzino now?

  • roblove

    This interview tells me that Lord Jamar most been wack even back in the day, this is a bitter rapper, that is not about Love. Peace, Unity, Love & Having Fun is my Hip Hop Motto since the 80s, no matter what color or sex. Stay Positive, there is good Music out there if you just listen, people are starting to wake up, nobody wanna hear the weak shit no more. Rappin about money, gold, bitches, fags, is OUT! BIG UP! KRS ONE, Evidence, Masta Ace, De La Soul, Pharoache Monch, Lupe Fiasco, PE, J-Ro, Chords, Nas, Scarface, Saigon, The Roots, Mos Def, Talib Kweli, Little Brother, Madlib, Big Krit, Showbiz & AG, Killer Mike, Murs, .... 1 Love!

  • Anonymous

    It is what it is. But don't act like Lord Jamar is saying something 99.9% of you niggas don't think. Niggas need to be honest about this shit, because I don't know about yall but I'm tired of seeing grown ass men tip toeing around subjects like this. Now, with that out of the way. I'm not saying I agree with Jamar, I just understand where he's coming from.

  • mgruppe.com

    Lord Jamar needs to chill the fuck out. Nobodys taking away shit from the black community, these white kids bought your Brand Nubian/Public Enemy/Lench Mob etc. back in the day, and even tried to walk and talk like you "rappers". Respect the culture? Man, shut the fuck up.

  • A Person

    Eh, personally, I will listen to any hip hop artist that shows that they have that knowledge that is so essential to the genre, and of course the hip hop sound that I have grown to love. I mean, I wouldn't say I am blind to race, but say, guys like Rugged Man, Apathy, Alchemist, Eminem (especially his old stuff), Vinnie Paz, etc, are all guys that I listen to regularly, mainly because they are all good lyricists that have a signature hip hop sound. Macklemore is obviously a more complex case, since he seems like a pop artist that is able to rap. Personally, I don't care for his stuff all that much, but he is far better than say, Chief Keef, French Montana, Lil Wayne, etc. Not that that is a high standard. So yea, overall, its not so much about race, but about the sound that I like more than anything else. Good hip hop is good hip hop, if I see lyricism that I like, I am all over that shit, if not, well, it isn't for me.

  • Doc Ice

    "I do Black Music." - Eminem.

  • Yssup Kidz

    The game of basketball was started by a white guy. By this dude's definition, there are a lot of black guests playing in the white man's house. You can wear the jerseys and drink the gatorade in the house, but its not your house. So don't push it too far and start voicing your opinion like "we should be able to dunk the ball". Respect the culture, two handed set shots only... Lord Jamar trolling...

  • I'm sayin

    You gotta keep in mind Lord Jamar music is spiritual based. (I know that might be hard to wrap around for some.) But its Islam based. So what he saying isn't bigoted as what a preacher might say. Word em up Jamar! And In God we trust was better than All for one Believe or not. ; )

    • jon

      sounds pretty bigoted and racist too me, the nation of islam is all about trying to brainwash individuals into believing everyone else is not getting into heaven. (a lot like all the other shit religions), poor lamar doesn't know what to really think of macklemore and may be a homosexual!. ps macklemore is pretty shit!

  • YESSIR

    Suburban whites who don't have the street IQ to know the difference between a C.O. and a policeman are still heartbroken that Ross doesnt know Pablo Escobar and that JayZ didn't lose 92 Bricks. The Streets and people who listen to music for entertainment don't concern themselves with weather or not Dr Dre was ever a "Gangsta" or if Pusha T ever sold kilograms or if Snoop ever lived off the earnings of a prostitute....we listen to rap-music for the sound of the instruments and the slickness of the poetry. Suburban whites listen to our music so they can live out a "Ghetto" fantasy through the lives of our rappers which is why they focus so much on what they perceive as real/fake or fabricated/authenticated...our music is their only means of getting a street education so they actually attempt to believe song lyrics are supposed to be biographical criminal confessions..

    • Anonymous

      look at this stupid motherfucker glorifying the hood. you act like its a good place. sounds like YOUR the one living in a ghetto fantasy where you think your tough soley because your from the hood. The hood just means that youre broke and either too lazy or too content to get out of the hood. Nobody wants to live in the hood besides people like you that feel like a badass cause your from the hood.

    • jon

      cause im white and yep bro definitely why I listen too 'your' music to pretend I live on a stoop from nine to five waiting to get shot because I cant get a job and I smoked all my stash like you, the true essence of living that 'ghetto' fantasy!. you fucking boner wake up to yourself would you!

    • jon

      but the real noreaga owes him a cupa favours doesn't he?

    • DaMamba

      Ayo you still posting this wack shit? C'mon son

  • Anon121

    i wonder what 2pac would say if he was alive....

  • Nick T

    What I learn most about white people from reading these mostly white comments, is that they have a massive superiority complex. They're very self righteous and think they're somehow "above" the things a lot of 'black people' choose to rap about. "How dare they talk about the struggles they had to deal with at the hands of white people, how dare they rap from the perspective a person from a white created ghetto, how dare they rap about having a better life after being deprived of anything and everything their whole lives. They should act like hipsters or pick up a dictionary and use big words to impress us. We control this shit and we should dictate what they do, even though they invented and we're just guests" lol That's what you guys sound like to me. White people have forgotten that they're just guests in our house. They have gotten WAAYYYY to bold and comfortable with this shit, look at these comments. They're no longer just buying rappers music for what it is, or accepting it... They actually think they can control it. They feel entitled to our music, as if it's the natural order of the world for them to take what we have. It's kind of unbelievable to me. It's articles like this that remind me why I don't have any white friends..

    • Garvey

      ^ its like swarm bruh! Does any one know any black hiphop sites? You know where these wiggas are blocked from posting.

    • HNIC

      What I learn? Way more bitter whiteboys visit this site than I thought.

    • Anonymous

      "they have a massive superiority complex" read up on 5%er ideology, then come full circle to this comment

    • Anonymous

      "They're very self righteous and think they're somehow "above" the things a lot of 'black people' choose to rap about." EXACTLY CO-SIGN 100%

    • DaMamba

      Ayo, I've never heard of any white dudes saying, "how dare these black rappers talk about making something out of themselves after a life of government-enforced poverty and government created ghettos." People usually get mad when dudes get wild ignorant and perpetuate a mentality that being ghetto is somethin kids should strive for and all that shit. Macklemore is mad annoyin as a rapper, but what's the big deal if son made a song about accepting gays or whatever? Anybody who really fucks with hip-hop knows all the sub-genres of it by now and real recognize real. You fuck with dudes like Mos Def, Kweli, Killer Mike, and you don't fuck with Wayne, Macklemore, Mac Miller, etc.

  • FrankKnows

    Well then you are a guest to drug dealing and legalized crime cuz White People were doing that shit way before you had a chance. Just another ignorant ass hood dude.

  • Truth

    He's right, Hip Hop it is a Black Genre he is right, so was rock n roll, But just like Rock N Roll White people have come along and made it better... The white rappers out now have taken black music and made it better than alot, not all but alot of Black MC's...

    • Anonymous

      whote made rock n roll better?? LOL They stole all the hits - so black people said fuck that and turned to Motown... We all know how that went... I give hiphop another 5 years before black people just start killing themselves

    • realtalk

      Did whites make rock better, or was they given opportunites or taken opportunties from past black musicians that could have or done or suppassed what whites did?

  • Anonymous

    Man just imagine if this was a white dude talkin about hockey or some shit. Racism should finally be irrelevant. A white rapper is the best selling artist in hip hop history and some of the best niggas in the game respect him and acknowledge he is a legend. What a fuckin bitter ass dude.

    • Anonymous

      U must have also not seen the other part of my statement. but thats ok.

    • Anonymous

      ^ first 4?? LOL (no u aint black)

    • HNIC

      I like Eminem's first four albums (yes, i'm black), don't get me wrong. But to bring up his sales is fucking ridiculous. The only reason he sells like he does is because he is WHITE. He even broke that shit down himself in "White America"..... "Let's do the math: if I was black, I woulda sold half I ain't have to graduate from Lincoln High School to know that".........Sales is a moot point in this context.

  • Anonymous

    This dude's a old ass bitter niggar.

  • PIDGEOTTO

    NOW the god dont got nothin against homosexualites but i gots to agree with this wooden barrel face havin ass nigga, lol hip-hop shouldnt be gay friendly dog. Gays can have that equal rights and same sex marriage but dont let that leak into hiphop culture....man through the years people have been saying that this shit evolvin....nah homie this shit is getting sissified, if you aint a hard nigga but you real and you love rap then real would recognize real, that's why hiphop heads appreciate that rugged feel, reminded us of our homies that were really smoking, drug-dealin, gangbangin, and all other ill ass street shit, but them niggas was the same niggas tellin us shorties to stay clear of that cause they witnessed firsthand how it destroyed THEIR lives--word is bond......i aint tryin to hear NO gay shit on the radio dog. one love and peace

  • Willy

    Racist, Irrelevant and Outdated. Nuff Said, you may have been fire back in the day, but don't speak this hateful shit...

  • Anonymous

    Keep Boo Boo'm all you want homie you have no power in this game

  • detroit niggroe

    Fuck this nobody old ass nigga. If someone wanna do a form of music, then so be it. Nobody gave a fuck when Ice T did his metal rock shit.

    • doya research

      and they couldnt say anything either cuz they stole rock n roll too. Jamar was on point and people dont wanna deal with it.

  • RROCK

    You young people don't know NOTHING! It's pathetic ,and the first thing you want to say is some person is old. You kids are the most unoriginal generation ever. You haven't came up with one original concept yet!

  • Rick Ross

    Bawse, white people suck dick, we fuck your women because we are better hung than you, we rap better, we have more superior genes. Bigger Dicks Bigger Muscles.

  • Ja Rule Army

    BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS

  • Ja Rule Army

    BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS

  • Ja Rule Army

    BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS...

  • Ja Rule Army

    BYE BYE NOW IM OUT...........I ACTUALLY GOT A LIFE LIKE YA LAMES 200+ plus COMMENTS OVER SOME RACIST BULLSHIT. LOOK AT KENYA MUSLIMS TERRORISTS KILLING EVERYBODY REPUBLICANS TRYING TO SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS 'SUPPOSEDLY' GETTING LOWER N THEY'RE AIN'T NO JOBS. BUT YEAH KEEP BUYING $300 DOLLAR SNEAKERS, THE NEW IPHONE AND KEEP SUCKING THE FLAVOR RAPPER OF THE MONTH. YOU PPL ARE PATHETIC. TIME TO PLAY SOME GTA V....... IF I AINT BANNED MORE JA RULE COMMENTS SOME OTHER TIME........KISS MY ASS..

  • Ja Rule Army

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  • Ja Rule Army

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  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles.....

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. .

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wr

  • Ja Rule Army

    ITS THAT TIME AGAIN N FUCK GUCCI.........................murda ITS THAT TIME AGAIN N FUCK GUCCI.........................murda ITS THAT TIME AGAIN N FUCK GUCCI.........................murda ITS THAT TIME AGAIN N FUCK GUCCI.........................murda ITS THAT TIME AGAIN N FUCK GUCCI.........................murda ITS THAT TIME AGAIN N FUCK GUCCI.........................murda

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles....

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles...

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles..

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote

  • Ja Rule Army

    OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN OKAY OKAY IT SEEMS YA LAMES FUCKING MISSED ME THE ARMY IS SHUTTING SHIT DOWN

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles.

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles. Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles.

  • Ja Rule Army

    Jeffrey Atkins (born February 29, 1976),[2] better known by his stage name Ja Rule, is an American rapper, singer, and actor from Queens, New York. Born in Hollis, Queens, he debuted in 1999 with Venni Vetti Vecci and its single "Holla Holla". From 1999 to 2005, Ja Rule had several hits that made the top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, including "Between Me and You" with Christina Milian, "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" with Jennifer Lopez, "Always on Time" with Ashanti, "Mesmerize" also with Ashanti, and "Wonderful" with R. Kelly and Ashanti. During the 2000s, Ja Rule was signed to The Inc. Records, which was formerly known as Murder Inc. and was led by Irv Gotti. He is also known for some well-publicized feuds with other rappers (in particular 50 Cent and Eminem). Contents 1 Early life 2 Music career 2.1 Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) 2.2 Rule 3:36 (2000) 2.3 Pain Is Love (2001) 2.4 The Last Temptation (2002) 2.5 Blood in My Eye (2003) 2.6 R.U.L.E. (2004) 2.7 Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) 2.8 The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) 2.9 Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) 3 Acting career 4 Personal life 4.1 Family 4.2 Legal issues 5 Feuds 5.1 50 Cent/G-Unit Records 5.2 Shady/Aftermath 6 Discography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Filmography 9 References 10 External links Early life Atkins was born in the Queens borough of New York City.[2] He was raised as a Jehovah's Witness by his mother, health care worker Debra Atkins,[3] and grandparents. At the age of five his sister died from breathing complications, leaving him as an only child. He attended Public School 134 in Hollis, a school he has described as having a predominantly black student body. He said he got into many fights at the school because of his small size, so his mother transferred him to Middle School 172 in Glen Oaks, which he described as a "white school".[4] Atkins earned his GED in February 2012.[5] Music career Atkins began his rap career in 1993 with his classic hip hop group Cash Money Click. He told Curtis Waller of MTV News that his stage name "Ja Rule" came from a friend who addressed him by that name; other friends called him "Ja".[6] In 1995, he made his first appearance on Mic Geronimo's "Time to Build" which featured Jay-Z and DMX, who were also in their early stages of their careers. In 1998 he had signed with Def Jam, and was also featured on Jay-Z's hit single "Can I Get A..." along with Amil which Ja Rule wrote the hook, and was going to be a Ja Rule solo song, until Jay-Z heard the track. Venni Vetti Vecci (1999) Ja Rule's debut album Venni Vetti Vecci was released in 1999, peaking at #3 on the Billboard 200 with 184,000 copies sold in its first week and eventually reached platinum status in the US due to the popularity of the hit single, "Holla Holla" which reached #35 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[7][8] Rule 3:36 (2000) Ja Rule returned in 2000 with his new single "Between Me and You", which featured Christina Milian which would end up getting Top 40 airplay. "Between Me and You" reached number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Put It on Me" featuring Vita and Lil' Mo reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The music video for "Put It on Me" had also topped the MTV Video Countdown for a week. The second album, Rule 3:36, was released on October 10, 2000 and had debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 with 276,000 copies in its first week, making it Ja Rule's first number one album. The album would be certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] Pain Is Love (2001) Ja Rule released his third studio album, Pain Is Love on October 2, 2001 and is considered to be Ja Rule's most commercially successful album of his career. The album spawned three top ten singles, two of them reaching number 1. The first single, "Livin' It Up", featuring Case, reached number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the second single "Always on Time", which featured Ashanti ended up being Ja Rule's first number 1 hit to top the Billboard Hot 100.[7] The remix of Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Real" which features Ja Rule, also topped the Billboard Hot 100. Like its predecessor, Pain Is Love topped the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 361,000 copies and was certified triple platinum by the RIAA.[8] The album would also receive a Grammy nomination in 2002 for Best Rap Album. By 2007, 3.6 million copies of Pain Is Love had been sold.[9] The Last Temptation (2002) The Last Temptation, Ja Rule's fourth album, was released on November 19, 2002. It featured two hit singles; "Thug Lovin'" (peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100), and "Mesmerize" another duet with Ashanti (peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100).[7] The Last Temptation debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 237,000 copies and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in December 2002.[8][10] Blood in My Eye (2003) Ja Rule's fifth album Blood in My Eye, was released on November 4, 2003 under the "Murder Inc." label, which renamed itself "The Inc." several days after the album release. The album was originally planned to be a mixtape, but Murder Inc. had ordered Ja Rule to release an album each year based on the requirements of his contract. The album was described as a "hate" album, directed at artists on G-Unit/Shady/Aftermath. It spawned one hit single, "Clap Back" which reached number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and had won him a Source Award for "Fat Tape" song of the year. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, selling 139,000 copies in its first week of release. It has since sold over 468,000 copies in the U.S.[10] In October 2003, Ja Rule met with Minister Louis Farrakhan, who wanted to intervene and prevent escalating violence in the feud between Ja Rule and 50 Cent.[11] R.U.L.E. (2004) Ja Rule's sixth studio album R.U.L.E. was released in November 2004 debuting at number 7 selling 166,000 copies in its first week of release. Its lead single was "Wonderful" featuring R. Kelly and Ashanti peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was followed by the street anthem "New York" featuring Fat Joe and Jadakiss which charted at number 27 on the Billboard Hot 100. The third single was the love song "Caught Up" featuring Lloyd which had failed to make an impact on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA certified R.U.L.E. Gold on January 14, 2005,[8] and by October 2007, the album had sold 658,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[9] Hiatus, departure from Def Jam and leaving The Inc. Records (20052009) Ja Rule performing in Fort Hood, Texas, May 13, 2005 On December 6, 2005, The Inc. released Exodus, a greatest hits album whose only new tracks were the song "Me" and intro and outro tracks. Exodus was the last album on Ja Rule's contract with The Inc. After the release of this compilation, Ja Rule took a hiatus from recording music.[2] In 2005, The Inc. Records came under investigation because of drug trades by Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, who was associated with Irv Gotti.[12] This led to Def Jam Recordings refusing to renew The Inc.'s contract. From 2005 to 2006, Gotti searched for other labels until finally reaching a deal with Universal Records (part of the same company as Def Jam). The Mirror and Mpire Music Group (2009) After leaving Murder Inc. Records in 2009, Ja Rule founded his own independent label, Mpire Music Group and recruited new artists while still maintaining friendship with Irv Gotti. The Mirror was to be Ja Rule's seventh album and set for a 2007 release date, however, due to poor reception to singles (partly believed to be due to his beef with 50 Cent), it was pushed back. Tracks from the album leaked online, leading Ja Rule to re-record the album. He eventually decided to release it as a free download in 2009. Pain Is Love 2, prison and Renaissance Project (2012present) In February 2011, it was announced that Ja Rule started working on another album called Pain Is Love 2, naming it after the original 2001 triple platinum album (Pain Is Love). It was planned to have production from the producers on the original Pain Is Love album in order to "recreate magic". Most of the production would be done by 7 Aurelius (who co-produced "Down Ass Bitch"), while Irv Gotti was the executive producer of the album. He had planned on releasing it June 7, although later decided to delay the release date in order to allow more time to perfect the "level and quality of the records" and to avoid "doing an injustice to [his] fans".[13][14][15] Pain Is Love 2 was slated for an October 11, 2011 release date but was pushed back to February 28, 2012.[16] To make up for the delay Ja Rule released a new track called "Falling to Pieces" which was produced by 7 Aurelius. The song samples The Script's "Breakeven".[17][18] On October 2, 2011, another track called "Spun a Web" was released, which was also produced 7 Aurelius and samples Coldplay's "Trouble". The following day a teaser music video premiered on YouTube and the official music video was released on October 11.[19] Pain Is Love 2 was finally released on February 28, 2012, while Ja Rule was serving a two-year sentence in prison for gun possession. Renaissance Project is the upcoming eighth studio album by Ja Rule which has yet to have a confirmed release date. Recording sessions for the album took place primarily at Mpire Studios in NYC Studio during 2008 to 2011. Production was handled by Rule and several others, including Benzino, 7 Aurelius and Buck 3000. Most of the tracks that were meant for the Renaissance were transferred over to Pain Is Love 2. Ja Rule was set to be released from prison on July 28, 2013, but on May 7, 2013, he was released early.[20] He then announced that a new album is on the way and he is getting offers from major labels and artists wanting to collaborate with him. N.O.R.E announced that Ja will be on a remix to one of the tracks off his latest album, Student of the Game. He is then set to go out on his tour, "40 Days, 40 Nights" tour. He was featured the remix to the track "She Tried" which features Lil Wayne and Birdman, which is off N.O.R.E's latest album Student of the Game. On September 18, 2013, Ja Rule released a track titled "Fresh Out Da Pen". The track had first premiered on Hot 97.[21][22] Acting career Aside from rapping, Ja Rule has established a career as an actor, his first film was a buddy movie with Pras, he famously appeared in The Fast and the Furious. In 2004, he appeared in several movies including Back in The Day with Ving Rhames and Pam Grier and Half Past Dead as Steven Seagal's co-star. He also starred in the movies The Cookout with Queen Latifah and Assault on Precinct 13. In 2013, he will appear in I'm in Love with a Church Girl. Personal life Family In April 2001, Ja Rule married Aisha Murray.[23][24][25][26] He also has three children; Brittany (born 1995), Jeff Jr Atkins (born 2000), and Jordan Atkins (born 2004).[27][28] Legal issues In 2003, he allegedly punched a man in Toronto, who later sued Ja Rule. The issue was settled out of court.[29] In 2004, police investigated whether a feud involving The Inc. led to a fatal shooting outside a nightclub party hosted by Ja Rule and Leon Richardson where they thought he shot Proof of D12.[30][31] On July 1, 2004, Ja Rule was arrested with Don Rhys for driving with a suspended license and possessing marijuana.[32] In July 2007, Ja Rule was arrested for gun and drug possession charges along with Lil Wayne, and Don Rhys who served eight months in prison during 2010 for attempted possession of a weapon stemming from the arrest.[33][34][35] New York Supreme Court judge Richard Carruthers rejected Ja Rule's argument that the gun was illegally obtained evidence.[36][37] On December 13, 2010, Ja Rule received a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to attempted possession of a weapon after the aforementioned 2007 concert. On March 8, 2011 Ja Rule's surrender date for his two-year prison sentence was set for June 8.[38] His publicist said that Ja Rule will turn himself in to authorities. He will go to Rikers Island first, then be sent to a state facility in Upstate New York.[39] In July 2011, Ja Rule received an additional 28-month prison sentence for tax evasion, to run concurrently with his state term, failing to pay taxes on more than $3 million in earnings between 20042006.[40] He was released from state prison on February 21, 2013, but was immediately taken into federal custody for the tax case, for which he has less than six months remaining on his sentence.[41] Ja Rule was held in Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and was set be released in July 28, 2013. On May 7, 2013, Ja Rule was released from prison early.[20][42] Feuds 50 Cent/G-Unit Records Before signing with Interscope Records, 50 Cent engaged in a well-publicized feud with Ja Rule and his label Murder Inc. Records. 50 Cent claimed that the feud began in 1999 after Ja Rule spotted him with a man who robbed him of his jewelry and also because of Ja Rule "trying to be Tupac".[citation needed] However, Ja Rule claimed the conflict stemmed from a video shoot in Queens because 50 Cent did not like Ja Rule "getting so much love" from the neighborhood.[43] A confrontation occurred in a New York studio where rapper Black Child, a Murder Inc. artist, stabbed 50 Cent, which resulted in him having three stitches.[4] In his book, 50 Cent details how Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff tried to resolve the conflict between him and Ja Rule. Allegedly, McGriff asked 50 Cent to leave them alone because of the money involved. 50 Cent insinuated the conflict had something to do with the shooting where he was ambushed and shot. Since then, Black Child publicly insulted 50 Cent twice in "There's a Snitch in the Club", and "You the Wanksta". In both songs, Black Child details violent actions directed toward 50 Cent.[4] The exchange of insult tracks released from both parties culminated in Ja Rule releasing Blood in My Eye, which was an album that returned additional insults to 50 Cent. Ja Rule eventually tried to quash the feud with 50 Cent by using minister Louis Farrakhan in a televised interview. However, the attempt at peace lost credibility as the interview was scheduled a day before Blood in My Eye was released. As a result, most fans, along with 50 Cent, dismissed the interview as a blatant publicity stunt. Because of the ongoing feud between the two, 50 Cent's labelmates Eminem, Dr. Dre, Obie Trice, D12, DMX, and Busta Rhymes also became involved and released tracks which insulted Ja Rule.[4] Ja Rule later released R.U.L.E. with the successful single "New York" featuring Jadakiss and Fat Joe in which Ja Rule took subliminal shots at 50 Cent. This single prompted 50 Cent to enter a feud with the two featured artists (see article on "Piggy Bank" for details). Although it seemed that the feud was over, Ja Rule returned with a track entitled "21 Gunz".[44] In response, Lloyd Banks and 50 Cent released the track "Return of Ja Fool" on Lloyd Banks' mixtape Mo Money in the Bank Pt. 4, Gang Green Season Starts Now.[44] 50 Cent claimed in 2010 that Ja Rule's beef with him and Shady/Aftermath has ruined Ja's career saying "We just ripped the nigga apart and he hasn't and can't come back from it." In an interview with MTV, Ja Rule stated that his album, The Mirror, would not be continuing any past feuds that he has engaged in. He said: There was a lot of things I wanted to say, and I didn't want there to be any bitter records on the album. Because I'm not bitter about anything that happened [in the past few years].[45] In May 2011, it was confirmed that both Ja Rule and 50 Cent ended the feud. Ja Rule said "I'm cool. We ain't beefing no more. We'll never collaborate. That's just what it is. You don't have to be at war with somebody, but it's also kind of like U.S. and another country that they may not get along with. We don't gotta go to war, but we're not friends either. But we can coincide inside of a world. He's doing him, and he's not thinking about me, and I'm doing me and I'm not thinking about him. In September 2013 in a interview with Angie Martinez on The Angie Martinez show HOT 97 both Ja Rule and Murder INC CEO/ Producer Irv Gotti acknowledged 50 Cent not only destroyed Ja rule's career however destroyed Murder Inc as a music label and a brand. Both Ja rule and Irv Gotti also explained an experience of when they both first heard 50 Cent's single In Da Club on the radio and stated that they record was 'so dope' that they had a problem. Both rappers went on to say that 50 cent was a hustler and liked his entrepreneurial mentality and they no problems with him 10 years on. "[46] Shady/Aftermath The conflict started after 50 Cent signed to Shady Records and Aftermath. Ja Rule stated that he had a problem with Eminem and Dr. Dre for signing someone he disliked.[47] The conflict escalated when Ja Rule released "Loose Change", in which he insulted 50 Cent, called Eminem by the name "Feminem", called Dr. Dre bisexual, and claimed that Suge Knight knew of Dre "bringing transvestites home". The song also includes lyrics that insulted Eminem's family (most notably his daughter) and acquaintances.[47] After the "diss" track mentioned earlier Eminem and his group D12 made the songs "Go to Sleep" and "Do Rae Mi" respectively Busta Rhymes joined the conflict when he was featured on the track "Hail Mary 2003", with Eminem and 50 Cent. The song, a remake of Tupac Shakur's song "Hail Mary", was done partially as a response to Ja Rule's remake of another Tupac song, "Pain" (retitled "So Much Pain"). The rappers felt that Rule could never amount to Tupac, and so they made the track, mocking him for trying to "imitate" the deceased rap icon. Eminem prevented Ja Rule from appearing on any of the "new" Tupac songs he produced, including those on Loyal to the Game.[48] Discography Main article: Ja Rule discography Studio albums 1999: Venni Vetti Vecci 2000: Rule 3:36 2001: Pain Is Love 2002: The Last Temptation 2003: Blood in My Eye 2004: R.U.L.E. 2012: Pain Is Love 2[49] Independent album 2009: The Mirror Compilation albums 2005: Exodus 2012: Icon Awards and nominations Year Award/Nomination 2001 Source Hip-Hop Music Award Won for Single of the Year "Put It on Me" MTV Video Music Awards nomination for Best Rap Video "Put It on Me" 2002 MTV Video Music Awards Won for Best Hip-Hop Video "I'm Real (Murder Remix)" MTV Video Music Awards nominated for Best Hip-Hop Video "Always on Time" American Music Award nominated for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group "Put It on Me" Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap Album Pain Is Love Grammy Awards nominated for Best Rap/Song Collaboration "Livin' It Up" World Music Awards Won for World's Best-Selling Rap Artist BET Awards Won for Best Male Hip-Hop Artist Artist GQ Men of the Year Award Won for Musician of the Year Teen Choice Awards Won for Male Artist of the Year NAACP Image Awards Won for Best Rap/Hip-Hop Artist Soul Train Music Award nomination for Best Rap/Soul or Rap Album of the Year Pain Is Love 2003 Source Award Won for R&B/Rap Collaboration of the Year "Thug Lovin'" American Music Award nomination for Favorite Hip-Hop/R&B Male Artist Grammy Awards nomination for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration "Always on Time" 2004 Source Award Won for Phat Tape Song of the Year "Clap Back" 2009 MTV Video Music Brasil nomination for Hit do Ano (Song of the Year) "Fly" Filmography Film Year Film/Television Role Notes 2000 Turn It Up David 'Gage' Williams Alongside Jason Statham and Pras. 2001 The Fast and the Furious Edwin Plays a supporting role as a street racer. 2002 Half Past Dead Nicolas 'Nick' Frazier Though a sequel was made, Ja Rule did not star in it. 2003 Crime Partners Hitman 2003 Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself 2003 Scary Movie 3 Agent Thompson Minor role 2004 The Cookout Bling Bling/Percival Assmackey 2004 Shall We Dance Hip Hop bar performer 2005 Back in the Day Reggie Alongside Ving Rhames 2005 Assault on Precinct 13 Smiley Supporting role 2006 South Beach Donnie Fox T.V. Series "The S.B."(episode 7) 2006 Furnace Terrence Dufresne 2008 Ja Rule:2005 Himself A concert from his 2005 European tour, plus bonus tracks and interviews. 2009 Just Another Day Himself 2009 Don't Fade Away Foster 2009 Kiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jumpoff Himself[50] 2010 Wrong Side of Town Razor Alongside wrestlers; Batista & Rob Van Dam 2012 The Cookout 2 Bling Bling Sequel to The Cookout 2013 Goat Willie Davis Post-production 2013 I'm in Love with a Church Girl Miles Montego His real son plays the younger version of himself, Miles.

  • walter White

    Are There Actually Any Good Black Rappers Out There I haven't Come Across One Eminem Is The G.O.A.T.

  • Clingwrap

    Last time i had guests I treated em with respect, made em feel at home, Jamar aint got no monopoly on this hip hop shit, white dudes have been in the graffiti game since the beginning, some of the best graffiti dudes are white, its about skills, not skin colour, graffiti was hip hop way before rap was, fuck this washed up motherfucker

    • be quiet

      i remember when white folks not only wouldnt be caught even listening to hip hop in a serious manner (including from going to clubs to at the sam goody listening station), but did their own thing (skateboarding, mud racing, crew rowing etc). But I know in their bedrooms they snuck and listened to that saturday nite master mix dance party on that staticky radio station eves dropping on our culture finding itself. Now, since its such a police state eliminating the fear of beat downs etc, white folks are coming out all bad-ass trying to dictate hip hop affairs and direction like they "been" around. No, believe me when I say, we'd be totally ok without white rappers like yall would be totally ok without black skateboarders (yep, we need to let yall have that, i agree. oh yeah, and golf, bad Tiger) ... (and tennis, damn and hockey)

  • smh

    saying eminem shouldnt have an opinion is rap bec hes white in a black started league is the equivalent of saying michael jordan shouldnt have an opinion in basketball bec hes black in a white started league.. its 2013..everyone 50,60+ just need to die off.. to many fucked up memz of the world

  • Anonymous

    And the best rapper is white. Eminem.

  • Proud To Be White

    these burnt pecies of toast need to go back to there hole stupid chikin eatin welfare monkeys Ooohahoohaaa

  • abu_maryam

    Lord Jamar is a bitter, old, irrelevant bigoted idiot.

  • Anonymous

    This isn't a race thing, this is an age thing. Lord Jamar is old as fuck, and like many old people he's ignorant. With every funeral comes more tolerance and awareness. We become a better society as these old dinosaurs die off.

    • d3

      yea i hope thats the case fam. cuz its crazy and ultimately embarassing if young african americans feel this way. It goes back to how white people invented basketball and countless other hobbies/trends/interests that black ppl have picked up just like how certain white ppl have picked up hip hop

  • woah

    ni**ers and their bitterness. only race in the world who wants to be equal and segregated at the same time. double standard for black people is crazy why do u think white ppl dont listen 2 what u say no more 1) we dont care 2) you cry wolf so much when shit rly happens its like who cares

    • woah

      nah not really @ anon- i go to alot of sites per day and this just happens 2 be 1 site. i also go on cnn and space sites and old school classic frank sinatra sites and basketball/football sites.. im white and i love being white. i get bad bitchs all day long and i wouldnt trade that to be this 60 year old bitter monkey loll

    • Anonymous

      The fact that you white people are on this hiphop site tells me you wanna be down and want to be like us so bad..and all of you are in denial. The whole world is influenced by what the BLACK man and Hip Hop runs the world.

    • D3

      stop yo.. all ur doing is proving stereotypes about white hip hop fans true.. You sound just as, if not more ignorant that jamar. And btw u obviously DO care what he has to say if ur taking time to write a comment and using the N word and calling out THEIR race. smmfh.