Maino Talks New York Hip Hop & "Let It Fly" Single

The Brooklyn, New York MC waxes off about the state of the culture.

In May, Maino dropped the Roscoe Dash-assisted single “Let It Fly” from his upcoming sophomore album The Day After Tomorrow, and recently he sat down with DJ Skee to talk about his new music and the state of New York Hip Hop.

“Since I came on the scene, which would be like 2008, everybody’s been asking me what the state of New York Hip Hop is,” he began. “But if you’re actually paying attention to New York Hip Hop there’s a lot going on. We just haven’t been able to connect with the rest of the country all the time.”

Listing artists like Lloyd Banks, Jim Jones and Fabolous, the Bed Stuy native sounded confident about the scene moving forward. “We’ve got to get back into the habit of making music broad and making music that not only New York can vibe to, but also the west coast and the south and that’s what I aim to do,” he said. 

“'Let It Fly,' right now, is looking to be one of the biggest records in the country this year,” he continued, explaining the decision to link up with Roscoe Dash. “I should be able to make music with anybody as long as it’s hot music. Just because I’m from Brooklyn and he’s from Atlanta - we should still be able to connect because its all Hip Hop, we’re all artists, we’re all creative. Why not be able to make music and get money with people all over?”

Maino’s sophomore album The Day After Tomorrow is due October 4. Check out the full interview below.

RELATED: Maino Reveals Guest Features & Producers For "The Day After Tomorrow"

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19 Comments

  • Anonymous

    How is Maino 'creative', except for the delusion he has any talent besides mugging and taking off his shirt fur DUDES?

  • Anonymous

    Let it fly right into the shitter-- Maino is THEE worst mc to ever 'break out' of New York, Jim Jones is fucking Nas x Busta x Cam in comparison. Did this retard read ANY books in goddamn jail?

  • Anonymous

    maino is nice!! and yeh he right banks holdin NY down

    • Anonymous

      Fuck outta here. Luda in a coma would destroy Maino in every possible way, if you want to talk 'southern'-style music. Maino is a fucking embarrassment to AMERICA, period, fuck his fake 'Brooklyn' and 'south' bullshit. Only thing he's 'holding down' is his boyfriend while he...

  • Anonymous

    and hiphopdx why yall gotta put a stupid pic of him smiling? lol yall foul for that

  • Anonymous

    this dude nice on records, and you know this single is for the ladys and strippers, who know maybe he is a big trick. his album songs are better tho so ill prolly downloaded first if its nice ill buy it im just sayin

  • Fish

    Hate all you want, Maino is better than 90% out there right now.

  • garbage

    This guy isn't just wack, but he is GARBAGE. Seriously guy has horrible rhymes and makes gay southern wanna be pop music. Yeah the big house really made toughened this guy up, he was probably under the guise of a man named Lilo who got fucked in the yard by other dudes.

  • tbae

    he only had one hot so so thats not that good looking to me..and his voice sound like it has a girl switch in it anyways

  • Anonymous

    This nigga is garbage.

  • Chairman

    Just a little food for thought... the most sampled artist in hip-hop history is James Brown. Who just happens to be from Augusta, GA. When NY hip-hop was at it's apex, producers were mainly making sample based beats, and the music they sampled even then originated in the South.

    • Chairman

      OF COURSE music had regional sounds! Why doi you think Berry Gordy marketed Motown the way he did? He intentionally gave all his artists charm lessons, and dance and acting classes so as to differentiate them from their "unsophisticated" Southern cousins in Memephis, and throughout the chitlin' circuit. The music James Brown made with the Famous Flames was unapologetically Southern rhythm and blues, ceated for the gin mills and hole-in-the-wall joints in the South. The difference is that the connection between blacks in the North and in the South was much stronger back then; many Northerners were less than a generation removed from their Southern roots. James Brown, Etta James, Junior Walker, etc then were the music that hip-hop's pioneers in New York grew up hearing their parent's listening to. Today, with two to three generations seperating the young listeners from the grandparent's Southern origins, there is a lot of dissention between the regions, which only heightens the difference in regional sounds that has always existed.

    • reEL Talk

      This is a POINTLESS post. back then, the music didn't have regional sounds. And it was GOOD music regardless. It was SOUL music, totally opposite of what the South does TODAY!

    • The MG

      But the music was better then.

  • Anonymous

    Ain't no such thing as "New York Hip Hop" anymore. Its just rappers from NY. but they be doing SOUTH music. The proof is in this interview.

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