Master P Defends "Wearing Dresses" Shot; Refutes Mannie Fresh's "Bout It" Claims

Exclusive: Master P says he's "here to take my corner back," he "can't change" his rowdy content and that one man is not to blame for the fall of No Limit Records.

Hate him or love him, no one can deny that Master P changed the game.

In today’s digital age of albums struggling to sell, it’s hard to recall a time when tapes and CD’s flew off of store shelves. For Master P and his once mighty No Limit Records, the second half of the 1990’s were a boom time not seen before or since in the music business. With sheer will, a stunningly supportive distributor (Priority Records, who only kept 15% of sales for their services—half of what iTunes and Amazon keep today on albums they don’t even have to press and ship), and an armload of raucous hits (“Bout It Bout It,” “Make ‘Em Say Uhh!,” “Wobble Wobble,” etc.), P turned himself, his lengthy label roster, and eventually the entire Southern region into the focal point of a culture previously obsessed with East versus West.  

Once unknown locals from P’s native New Orleans like Fiend, Mia X, Mac and Mr. Serv-On shockingly debuted at the top of the charts and procured gold and platinum plaques almost instantly–they had to; due to No Limit’s frenetic release schedule there was a new releasing bearing the label’s gold-emblazoned tank logo dropping almost every week.    

The “Ice Cream Man” not only revolutionized retail, but the approach of aspiring artists and label heads nationwide. For better or for worse, Master P wannabe’s sprung up across the country. D-boys who became overnight CEO’s of local labels in—what would prove to be—the waning days of slanging self-made CD’s on street corners adopted P’s assembly-line approach to creating and distributing their product—complete with replicas of P’s gaudy, computer-generated Pen & Pixel album covers adorning their own mass-produced interpretations of the rowdy tunes crafted by No Limit’s in-house collective of on-call producers, Beats By The Pound.
 
Some of those P clones jumped behind the mic as well, proudly identifying themselves not as “emcees” but as “hustlers” rhyming solely for profit. P’s reinterpretation of the “rapper” planted the seeds that would be harvested by future hustlers-turned-spitters Young Jeezy, French Montana, Gucci Mane and countless others.

And while there were an enumerable amount of No Limit detractors enraged by Master P’s seeming treatment of culture as merely commerce to match the masses influenced by his new business model, there were millions of loyal supporters showing up to mom-and-pop record stores every Saturday to get the few-day jump on the rest of mall-shopping mainstream America’s consumption of everything “The Colonel” was selling. The then $350 million man successfully sold everything not nailed to the ground, releasing albums from random newcomers (Lil Italy anyone?) to star free agent signings (Mystikal and Snoop Dogg) until, in what seemed like an instant, his empire came crashing down.

Roughly a dozen years after his monument to the power of self-starting collapsed in on itself, HipHopDX spoke to the head of the recently rebranded No Limit Forever record label and got the jaw-dropping story straight from Master P’s mouth of how the most successful commercial run of any label in Hip Hop history essentially ended when the then record company CEO/CBA player (and NBA tryout) decided his company’s sonic architects were “some old shoes” he couldn’t continue rocking. While at times audibly disgusted with having to deal with decade-old grievances still being levied at him by some former “No Limit Soldiers” (and one former member of the Cash Money army), P remained remarkably forthcoming during his discussion with DX – even providing his previously-reported revelation that he talked to Tupac about jumping aboard the tank.

One-third of the Louie V Mob (along with Atlanta’s Alley Boy and D.C.’s Fat Trel) additionally discussed his just-released Al Capone mixtape (which serves as the free warm-up to P’s first digital album, Boss Of All Bosses), his parental guidance of Chief Keef, and his disdain for “new niggas wearing dresses” in a must-read interview for any longtime No Limit supporter—or even any nauseated No Limit hater. Uhh! Na na na na.

Master P Discusses Starting Over And “Dress-Wearing,” Remarks

HipHopDX: Did you ever think back when No Limit was selling an album every couple of weeks, something like 20 million copies just in 1998 alone, that we would ever reach the day where you’d have to give the shit away for free?

Master P: You gotta be able to change with the times and what’s going on. Instead of me going on what I did 10, 15 years ago, I’m like, “If you gonna be relevant in 2013, you gotta start all over from the beginning, from the bottom.”

I don’t want no fringe benefits of what I did. ‘Cause, I feel like I got back in this game [to compete], and your swag gotta be right. You gotta be able to be relevant with this generation. And I think that’s what I was able to create with this Al Capone album; not trying to be like, “Oh, I’m an artist that sold 75 million records.” It’s like I’m reintroducing myself to a whole new generation of music buyers. It’s almost like the street thing. If you know me, the “Ice Cream Man,” you know I’ma give you the first one for free anyway.

DX: On “Brick To A Million” from the Al Capone mixtape, you note that the game done changed in more ways than one: “New niggas wearing dresses / Fuck it, I ain’t scared to address it / Gangsta niggas on skateboards.” Since you ain’t scared to address it, break down why you went after the youngn’s and the shit that they’re wearing and doing?

Master P: I think a lot of people took that as I’m going after the youngn’s, but I’m really not; even though we definitely on a different time zone as far as street artists right now.

That record was made for this program director that come to the job, a young dude. He on his skateboard, [and] he got like one of those look like mini type of skirt; plaid type of things going on and he think he a real dude. And this same dude was trying to tell me my career done, like I can’t do this. And I’m like, “C’mon man, really?”

Master P Explains His Empathy For Chief Keef And Abandoning Positive Rap

DX: You are showing some love to one notable name from the new generation: Chief Keef. Sosa surfaces on “It Don’t Make No Sense” on Al Capone. And on Game’s “HVN4AGNGSTA” you made a point of mentioning how Keef is just trying to eat. Why did you feel the need to speak up and defend the kid?

Master P: When you look at a Chief Keef—you could look at a Master P, you could look at all the artists that come from the streets—eventually you gon’ get it, you gon’ understand. And I just feel like that’s a reflection of us. We come from the Calliope Projects; it coulda went any way for us.

These kids just trying to make it. If you listen to all my old music, I’m just a ghetto kid trying to make it. And as you get there, you get some money, [and] you gonna evolve into something else once you able to see a different side of life. So first time you go through that process to where you get the money, and then that next process you gon’ start realizing how valuable you are.

We could also use this generation as a disposable bottle, and you could just get rid of ‘em as they come. And that’s what the game will do to an artist like Chief Keef, if you don’t have the right people on your team and the right people fighting for you. These some young kids [that] if we show ‘em something else they gon’ be alright. They gon’ do what they need to do. Sosa is a very talented young dude.

DX: Do you feel like that parental need, since you got kids? Do you feel like a parent when you’re around Keef?

Master P: I feel like a parent around any generation of street music that came after me. And I just feel like it’s my duty that I’m gonna give ‘em that blueprint, show ‘em the dos and the don’ts, the good’s and the bad’s, the mistakes I made, the good things I did, if they willing to listen.

DX: Now, you know there are gonna be some folks that are gonna question your alliance with a cat like Keef and your return over these last couple of years to making that gutta street shit. So I have to just bluntly ask, do you think you were setting a better example for the new generation with the curse-free positive Rap you dabbled in a few years back? Is that the way you should of kept going, or do you feel like you can mold more young minds by speaking to ‘em in their language, by giving ‘em some of that ghetto d?

Master P: This is the only way. Think about it. I can’t change who I am; I tried.

I tried for society to say “P man, try to do something.” I can’t; this my God-given talent. I’m not a preacher or nothin’ like that, [so] this the way I talk to my people that come from the gutta, come from where I come from. And the only way they get to hear me is they gon’ have to be able to relate to me, and they know that I’m relevant and they know that I’m real.

Master P Breaks Down The Collapse Of No Limit Records

DX: I referenced your classic 1997 album in that last question, so if you don’t mind let’s take it back to them late ‘90s days for a quick second to once and forever deal with some matters from No Limit’s past. First, Mia X told me during her 2009 HipHopDX interview that you “had decided to pursue a whole thing in basketball. And, No Limit, we was used to being just together. It was a family unit. We were very close. And when he decided to play basketball he had to bring in an unfamiliar staff. And so a lot of things just started to like breakdown.” Did something as seemingly unrelated as basketball really bring down the most successful commercial run of any label in Hip Hop history?

Master P: Nah. I think that people gotta look at...I’m not God, man. I’m just a person that go through trials and tribulations, good times, bad times. So I think everybody gonna use an excuse of what it was.

Music is a time period. It last [but] for so long. I feel that our sound wasn’t the same. There was a new era of sound coming on, and that’s what it was. It was either you gonna get in there and find that next new sound and be a part of that next movement [or stall out.] Having a ten year run at what we did was great. Most people get a one or two-year [run], just have one hit record. I think what we did is greater than any other company has done in the music business, as far as a run. But then you have to go back and be able to regroup. Sometimes it might take a little time or whatever.

[Plus] everybody wanna do different things. Mia X decided to do different things that she liked to do. Once you successful, it’s a process. It’s like being a kid: you gonna go through adolescence, [and then] turn into a man, turn into a woman. So I just think that we went through a changing of the guard, as far as the music business, where somebody else got a chance to get it and they caught the [wave] and that’s how it go.

You just can’t stay with what you have because [times change]. And that’s something that we didn’t do. If we stayed on there to start searching cross the country to find the next talent, then you keep something like that going. But you can’t just last with the people that you have. ‘Cause you do get older; some people swag don’t be the same; some people not as hungry as they used to be. And so I think to make a movement keep going like that, you have to go find the next new young talent. And we didn’t do that. We relied on the older talent that we had.

DX: Is that why you didn’t wanna negotiate with Beats By The Pound, which they claim caused them to bounce and basically led Fiend, Mystikal, etc. to follow them out the door?

Master P: Yeah. I mean, it wasn’t no reason to renegotiate ‘cause they had the same sound. It was time to move on. Why would I renegotiate with something that I know it’s passed its time? That’s like buying some old shoes that you already done wore; you can’t do nothing with ‘em.

DX: I don’t know, me personally, after I heard Fiend’s “The Baddest” for the first time I woulda been like, Y’all can have as much muthafuckin’ money as y’all want. [Laughs]

Master P: Well, I mean, how many records [does] Fiend sell right now?

It was business. It sounds good what you saying, but the numbers don’t add up. That’s why I’m doing what I’m doing right now. I’m not sitting around talking about what I did ten years ago; I’m doing something about my career right now. And I think that’s what everybody should be doing if they have talent. If you don’t have talent you gon’ play the blaming game. And I’m not doing that, because I wish everybody well. Everybody at the time, I think we did the best that we could do as an organization. And now it’s time to move on. Now you gon’ either be a coach or go try to find your swag and be able to maintain, which that’s hard to do for a lot of artists.

Master P Reveals He Talked To Tupac About Becoming A No Limit Soldier

DX: Let me just ask you one more question from No Limit past. I’ve always been curious to know, were there any other big names besides Snoop Dogg that you tried to sign to the tank during them days? Any other big free agents that you tried to bring over?

Master P: [Pauses] Uh … to be honest wit’chu, at one time, I was thinking about signing Tupac.

DX: When you were still out in Richmond [California]?

Master P: Yep. I was thinking about [it], ‘cause he was in Oakland and really just getting together. He was liking the movement of what we was doing, but we wasn’t fully there yet. So, it was like, we doing our thing, and people just would see it. And, that was one little piece that I was looking at like, “You know what? This could be alright.”

DX: Did you get a chance to talk to Tupac directly?

Master P: Yeah.

DX: And, do you remember if he was interested?

Master P: Everybody was interested in No Limit. I don’t think there was one person in the music business that wasn’t interested in being a part of that movement.

DX: This is some new information; I was under the impression you and ‘Pac had never really conversed, that y’all were in the same Bay Area but that you guys had never really crossed paths.

Master P: Me and [C-Murder], we opened up for Tupac at first, going on tour. So we go way back with them, mayne.

Master P Talks Mystikal’s Cash Money Signing And Mannie Fresh’s “Bout It” Claims

DX: Well I asked that previous question as a bad segue to asking you what your initial thoughts were when you heard Mystikal had signed to Cash Money?

Master P: I was happy for Mystikal, but at the time I wasn’t doing nothing. And Cash Money, they was on the top of they game. I thought it made sense for the type of talent that Mystikal has, to be with who ever best at that time. And I think that this was something that they probably always wanted. They knew the type of talent Mystikal has and was like, “Shit, put him on our team.” You don’t wanna go against Mystikal, ‘cause he’s that talented.

I thought it was a good move for him. But, sometimes too, you gotta look at the sound. So, it’s all timing.

DX: I think a lot of folks expected you to feel a different kind of way about Mystikal doing that.

Master P: Why?

DX: Due to the long history…

Master P: But me and Mystikal like brothers, man. Sometimes you gotta do what’s best for you and your family. So, it ain’t no hatin’ stuff over here. I got real love and respect for Mystikal. I wanna see him be successful and do what he doing. At the time, I wasn’t [in the game] hard like I’m in it now. If I was, then he’d be right here. But I wasn’t. You can’t dwell on that. You don’t see me dwelling on the past. We playing chess over here, we not playing checkers. We making moves. And like they say in The Bible, you gotta be able to celebrate other people’s success. So, I’ve always celebrated people’s success. I just hope people can celebrate mines, ‘cause 2013, this ours.

DX: Did you celebrate Cash Money’s success? Let me just bluntly ask, ‘cause you know people been wanting to know for years…

Master P: Yeah. Man, I’m happy for them. They from the same city I’m from. It’s always been a friendly competition with us.

DX: I don’t know, when I spoke to Mannie Fresh in 2011for HipHopDX  he told me the competition maybe wasn’t so friendly at one point. He talked about the origins of the “bout it” slanguage; that U.N.L.V. had a song using “bout it” before you did. I know you don’t wanna revisit all that, but was there some tension back in the mid-‘90s over the “Bout It” [record]?

Master P: Man, let me explain something to you, Mannie Fresh was a producer, a beat-man; we really from the streets, man. If it was any tension, why you gonna wait till now to say something? I never heard a U.N.L.V. “Bout It” song. When you talk about “Bout It,” you gotta pull that up; No Limit is “Bout It.”

[With] all that I think people need to be themselves instead of trying to sell newspapers. I ain’t into all that, man. It’s not a gimmick for me, this for real. So, I wish him the best of luck, but I never talked to Mannie Fresh back then...don’t even know him like that. I always thought he was a great producer, and I think he should stay in his lane at that.

And if you feel like it’s some bad blood over a record or something, c’mon man. [16] years ago you ain’t say nothing and you saying something now? So you must not be no real dude. ‘Cause if somebody took something from me, I’m going to see him.

You shoulda been did an interview with him.

DX: Honestly, hand to God, I didn’t even know there was a U.N.L.V. “Bout It” song until he mentioned it.

Master P: I ain’t never heard it. And if it was, and if it ain’t successful, it don’t matter. You know how many songs I done made that wasn’t successful somebody else made [the concept] successful; you think I’m worried about it? Just like his music, you know how many beats people made [the same way]. The “Trigger Man” beat, that’s how they came up. You know how many people made that? It’s who do whatever [with it].

So, I ain’t into all that hatin’, man. I’m into celebrating people’s success, doing what I do. We live an eye-for-an-eye over here. We ain’t out starting trouble; we ain’t looking for trouble, we doing what we gotta do.

DX: So looking forward to the future, what are your current plans for the rebranded No Limit Forever label?

Master P: Well, you see the Ice Cream Man back; Al Capone. And I’m here to take my corner back. That’s what is. So 2013, be looking for Alley Boy, Fat Trel, Miss Chee, T.E.C., T-Bo, Bengie B.

DX: I heard Krazy on the mixtape.

Master P: That’s where the loyalty lies at. When you think about all what we done been through, we don’t put our problems on one man. You get out there and hustle and grind if you a street dude. That’s what I respect Krazy for, and that’s why we been so loyal so long. Because, Krazy from the projects and he doing what he gotta do as a man. We get out here and feed our kids and take care of our family. That’s what we do. We don’t put it on somebody else, our problems. We get out there and go make it better. We thankful for whatever run we had in this music industry. We get on our knees and thank the man up above and say, “Thank you.” We got an opportunity to make it out the projects, see some money, have some fun, travel; we thankful.

RELATED: Master P, Silkk the Shocker, Romeo Celebrate 20 Years of No Limit with Concert

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88 Comments

  • Anonymous

    I wish 2pac would had sign with No Limit. He might still be alive. R.I.P. 2pac 1 Luv 1 Thug

  • Anonymous

    None yall got sense

  • Anonymous

    Master POS. Nobody gives a fuck about you anymore, and no Tupac never wanted to sign to you, he most likely never even met you. Pac was on top of the rap game when he died, you didn't blow up until AFTER he died. No Limit wasn't even a main brand yet, so that makes no sense you dumb inbred southern retard.

  • Anonymous

    Fuckin liar, Pac was on top of the rap game with Deathrow before this cocksucker and non talented cronies even blew up. Why the fuck would he ask Pac to sign to a label nobody even knew? He didn't even blow up till after Pac died. P your music is horrible, always was, you're irrelevant now, and thanks for killing hip hop.

  • E MOney

    That's hilarious that Mannie Fresh is claiming P stole a UNLV song when Mannie Fresh and Wayne literally stole GO DJ from UNLV.

  • obinna samuel

    P was soulja i have always fellows since from 90s he gud to go.i love him a gud hustler of all time.

  • Freshlydip

    I used to respect Master P's hustle.... Independently showed the world how to really take a independent label from the street level to the forefront.....but when you say YOU'RE GONNA DO POSITIVE RAP AND YOU DITCH THAT FOR MAKING STREET SHIT... YOU'RE WACK AS A MAN TO ME.....MONEY DON'T MAKE THE MAN....REAL STAND UP FATHERS AND MEN KNOW.. THIS... THE PROBLEM WITH A LOT OF PEOPLE NOW IS THAT THEY DON'T STAND FOR ANYTHING... AND FALL QUICK for anything! !.YOUR WORTH 350 MILLION YOU CAN'T MAKE POSITIVE MUSIC?..weird. YOU HAVE ARTIST DOING THAT WITH 350 DOLLARS.. DEE ONE IS DOING IT AND I'M SURE HE HAS MORE THAN 350 DOLLARS but he's doing it.. DEAD PREZ BEEN DOING IT AND THEY HAVE A SOLID CAREER AND THeir MUSIC IS STREET AND POSITIVE.....ASK ANY MC FROM JAYZ to NAS AND THEY WILL TELL YOU DEAD PREZ IS THE TRUTH..I HEARD IT FROM BOTH OF THEIR MOUTHS IN PERSON!!...SO WHEN A MAN COPS OUT AND MAKE B.S MUSIC.....AYO!! MASTER P WHAT HAPPEN TO BETTER BLACK ENTERTAINMENT T.V?....THIS MUSIC SHIT IS SAD... IT'S LIKE SWITCHING A RELIGION....IN REGGAE SIZZLA BeeN INDENPENDENT AND HIS SELLING AND DOING POSITIVE MUSIC NOt SELLING MILLIONS BUT HE'S SELLING TENS OF THOUSANDS OF RECORDS.. AND CONSTANT TOURING......WE NEE INTEGRITY....MASTER P IS A DISAPPOINTMENT WITH 350 MILLION.....MANHOOD HAS TO BE MAINTAINED..... THESE DUDES DON'T REPRESENT REAL MANHOOD.... if you look a the news every body robbing and swindling an "we say oh look they're getting away with murder" "look at this politicians" but truthfully these artists are no different and the people who support the B.S.. They would do the same thing if they were placed in the same position as the politicians...Kinda of dudes that if they saw a little girl get raped by a dude with money.. they would say "but dude sold millions" he has money.....Money ain't everything ... people who think money is all are snakes and because they worship money they would back stab you quick Postedjust now | Reply

  • Freshlydip

    I used to respect Master P's hustle.... Independently showed the world how to really take a independent label from the street level to the forefront.....but when you say YOU'RE GONNA DO POSITIVE RAP AND YOU DITCH THAT FOR MAKING STREET SHIT... YOU'RE WACK AS A MAN TO ME.....MONEY DON'T MAKE THE MAN....REAL STAND UP FATHERS AND MEN KNOW.. THIS... THE PROBLEM WITH A LOT OF PEOPLE NOW IS THAT THEY DON'T STAND FOR ANYTHING... A FALL QUICK..IF YOUR WORTH 350 MILLION YOU CAN'T MAKE POSITIVE MUSIC... YOU HAVE ARTIST DOING THAT WITH 350 DOLLARS.. DEE ONE IS DOING IT AND I'M SURE HE HAS MORE THAN 350 DOLLARS... DEAD PREZ BEEN DOING IT AND THEY HAVE A SOLID CAREER AND THERE MUSIC IS STREET AND POSITIVE.....ASK NY MC FROM JAYZ AND NAS AND THEY WILL TELL YOU DEAD PREZ IS THE TRUTH..I HEARD IT FROM BOTH OF THEIR MOUTHS IN PERSON!!...SO WHEN A MAN COPS OUT AND MAKE B.S MUSIC.....AYO!! MASTER P WHAT HAPPEN TO BETTER BLACK ENTERTAINMENT T.V?....THIS MUSIC SHIT IS SAD... IT'S LIKE SWITCHING A RELIGION....IN REGGAE SIZZLA BIN INDENPNDENT AND HIS SELLING AND DOING POSITIVE MUSIC NO SELLING MILLIONS BUT HE'S SELLING TENS OF THOUSANDS OF RECORDS.. AND CONSTANT TOURING......WE NEE INTEGRITY....MASTER P IS A DISAPPOINTMENT WITH 350 MILLION.....MANHOOD HAS TO BE MAINTAINED..... THESE DUDES DON'T REPRESENT REAL MANHOOD....

  • krs

    Dude p w as my favorite but he git nuthin on rixh gang allstars man thay off that mother fxin chain

  • @manonthesquare

    Uh Master P sold over 75millllion records & has 5 Grammy awards as a solo artist alone. Do ur homework.

  • PeteRuiz

    I was the one who posted the last anonymous comment.....Glad to see P going back to his roots....u could take the boy out the hood, but you cant take the hood out the homeboy!! Make that pop your speaker beats again P!!!!

  • Anonymous

    No Limit was the hardest realist street shit after deathrow collaspe......& I'm from the WEST.....Ice crea m man, Ghetto D & the 2nd Tru albums....Classics!!! But to me C murder was shit!!! Free Corey!!!!!!

  • GetouttahereP

    If the sound was so outdated and worn out, why are u still remaking THEIR songs to this day? For example break'em off something! Beats by the Pound all day! They are still relevant to this very day. They are musicians not beat makers. A tru production team who had their own business individually before they came together as a collective. You are mad because bbtp pulled the plug on your empire...single handed. After they left the whole tank left. Then u brought in a whack ass production team and called them beats by the pound and the REAL bbtp had to take you to court. You did NOT take care of the tru tank dogs that help you build that empire. Wanksta

    • e

      Break em off was a pimp c beat. Please know what you are talking about before you speak

    • TheDesolute1

      So tru...alotta shit I read in this article is sum fugazi excuse making...he jus ain't wanna cut dat check and his cheapskate ideology end up ended his run....he took his self out da game by not taking care of what he should have...at that time, nobody India industry had "his sound" because bbtp WAS his sound and he had them in an exclusive contract!! So how can he say the sound in the game was changing and they was old news??? Bbtp def know how to stay away ahead of the sound of today.

  • khordkutta

    listened to the fiend song, just sounds like they reworked ll cool js "im bad"

  • Anonymous

    P showed the rap game how to get paper. Now you have Forbes making lists for rappers. Young men coming from nothing to being millionaires and their own bosses.

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, by showing non talented rappers how to make simple shit, steal other rappers' styles, water it down, and be repetitive, and make millions. Thus the reason why the game is flooded with horrible rappers to this day.

  • Anonymous

    Master P is the best rap hustler to ever do it. A lot of people grew up on No Limit and there is no denying this. I don't understand why people continue to disrespect the man. Stop frontin like the music was bad

  • Rapstarz

    FYI. Wobble wobble was originally on Magic's album. P took it and tweaked it and took credit for it. How you gonna do that to your own record label artist?

  • K4

    MASTER P A STREET NIGGA THAT RAPS. NIGGA GOT PLENTY OF VERSES THAT SLAP. I STILL RIDE TO THAT GHETTO D.

  • djruga

    master p know how to pacakge a project his new records are on point everythang from his music to his promo visuals i know he got a huge team backing him cause he everywhere right now cant wait till my nigga start dropping some music videos cause his singles from al capone r crucial street music just what the game lacking right now

  • djbvax

    Yup. I remember when P came out. He was wack and the south supported him so majors HAD to look at him. He still sucks and even though he knows how to make a dollar. Money does not equal rap skills. Hammer, Vanilla Ice, Waka it just goes on and on..

    • Rich

      Yup, Master P kick started the trend of horrible rappers becoming mainstream hit makers. If anybody can be blamed for "killing hip hop", it's this POS.

    • jenkins45

      Master P has had plenty of hit records and did it without the radio without a major deal he did it with his team and his team of street artist. the majors never gave him a deal p was outselling the majors every week p used to sell a million copies every tuesday who does that now? P know how to put togther a record and give the fans whats hot, he aint no KRS ONE but P outsells KRS ONE 50 to 1. Take a chance to listen to his music its real its street and we relate to it

  • coolTyrone

    Once again Master P changing the game. Squashing all hate and making money. Ending senseless and stupid beef and making music. Once you're a man he said she said crap is worthless. P keepin real.

  • Kaptinkirk

    if you hatin master p, cause u never heard TRU 2 DA GAME, ICE CREAM MAN, GHETTO D OR DA LAST DON REAL NIGGAS FUCK WIT P AND THE TANK

  • Anonymous

    Master P taught you clowns how to clean up your dirty money.

  • bawse

    #Percy u still a fuQ ni99a after all these years first off your lying about pac wanting to sign to no limit at that time u wasnt selling no records & what actually put u on the map was "is there a heaven for a gangsta" a song u stole from #pac after he died ofcourse. You also stole "ice cream man" from #YUKMOUTH & the #Hotboy song from #CASHMONEY not to mention u had your son lil romeo inpersonate #LilBowWow lol percy u got rich off of bitting but now the gig is up sucka #KickRocks

    • scott

      Only crybabys said you stold from people cause they made more than you yuckmouth sucks anyway he got mad cause p made more money than him for ice cream man it was dru down song anyway

    • Anonymous

      hey bawse if it wernt for P your fav rapper wouldn't even have had a blue print to be calling him self a bawse

  • bleed blue

    MASTER P IS A VERY SMART BIZ MAN I REALLY THINK HE CAN BRING NO LIMIT BACK TO THE TOP ALL HE NEEDS TO DO IS FIND ONE YOUNG CAT THAT IS HUNGRY AND HAS A GOOD BUZZ BECAUSE PEOPLE MISS THAT 90S SOUND AND JUST THE NO LIMIT HISTORY WILL DRAW ENOUGH INTRIST FOR PEOPLE TO GIVE IT A LISTEN!

  • Anonymous

    master p is a ledgend in the game and getto d is a classic album not many rappers have that under they belt if he dropped an album tom id pick it up he is like the dr dre of the south!

    • Anonymous

      Dre is actually talented though. And Ghetto D was the only decent album from the thousands of albums those niggas put out back then, and even it's not very good. No Limit was horrible, still is, Deathrow had actual classic hip hop albums.

  • no

    P sucks. His music sucks. Just because he was a good business man, doesn't mean that he was a good rapper, or even a cool guy. He's a douche, his movies sucked, and his stupid tv show with his faggy son was awful. Delusional niggas are the only ones saying he's a legend because of these stupid dress/skateboard remarks. The marks on this site will hop on anyone's dick if they make fun of the people that they have a problem with.

  • Percy stop lying

    I love Master P and all, but he shouldn't be trying to imply Pac wanted to sign with the No Limit.

  • Anonymous

    Master P showed the record companies a fool from the south will part with their money for rappers with no talent. Ever since we get a new terrible rapper from the south every year. From Lil Flip to Mike Jones to Paul Wall to Young Joc to ect......

    • Wu-Tang Forever Foreal Fuck Faggy Drake

      Exaaaactly, Master Piece of Shit started this horrible trend, before him niggas had to be talented to sell records. His fuckery of the game still exists to this day.

  • Anonymous

    read the article, just scrolled down to say, how you gon me the "louis V mob" and you out rocking fake Lous Vuitton hats?? The LV is crooked af. smh wow! FWM on twitter @MrDamier and soundcloud.com/dytdre

  • Anonymous

    If money believes he can help Chef Keif or Chief-Kief what the fuck is his name then good, but all in all, there is only one S.O.S.A and its' AZ; Real skills and street approved.

  • Sam Snead

    Master P had a couple hot records back in the day and so did cash money with juvenile coming out but after that period hip hop had a short revival starting w Chronic 2001. 98&99 were the years that, that kinda music was kinda new and I liked it at the time but once chronic 2001 came out I kinda went back to more nitty gritty hip-hop with Rawkus records,aftermath,roc,nas and then in 2004 new orleans stylw southern rap really came back and has hung on for years but it just doesn't have the appeal for me as it used to when it was new, not saying it hasnt changed over the years.

  • D-NUCKS

    no limit always sucked to me...did't fuck with them...had to listen to it cause everybody in my highschool was on they shit. but me? naww. The only reasson why No limit blew up, is cuase death row crumbled after pac died. People were looking to fill that void. Master P knew this..thats why he started rapping and trying to sound like Pac. Mystical was the best artist he ever had. I respect Mater P's hustle and grind...but his music is STRAIGHT DUMPSTER JUICE.

    • freddygibbs

      this nigga anonymous must not be from the south this nigga said no real niggas listen to master p this nigga dumb in sip we still play that p daily we dont fuck wit yall type round here and he named a bunch of artist that fell off master p still coming hard on these records

    • Anonymous

      real talk the real cats that fuck with that real music in my hood only fucked with that make em say ugh jawn, masterp was lame lol straight up pac clone, only clown ass white dudes and corny ass radio pretty boy niggas listen to this bullshit, ya'll can have it... I'll stick to pun, mop, psycho realm, beatnuts, AZ, cormega, lord finesse, mc eiht,if i'm listening to late 90's gangsta shit

  • Cash_Money_Killaz/No_Limit_Killaz

    Master P is responsible for the downfall of hiphop. Not one album from no limit is worth 4 stars/mics. These were all weak to average mc's. Thanks to No Limit we have a new generation of wack mcs like: french montana, young jeezy, young shit, lil shit, big shit etc. I doubt it doub it if Master P is bout it bout it!

  • IROC

    Master P did his thang and put the south on big time Cash Money did big thangs and has kept the south poping, No limit has some fire even in the second round with fiend and other artist but P dream of NBA career ended all that every artist and label will go thru it look around Death Row had its time Bad Boy had its time 50 has had his time, Rocafella had they time and countless others .

  • speak

    the author is a really good hip hop writer. Ive enjoyed his work on dx and he knows hiphop history. Therefore, I couldn't help but feel that he had his hands tied as he was writing this -- like he was unable (for whatever reason) to go into certain topics. Specifically, there is no way to write an article about alleged biting by master p and not address the bay area issue. Everyone knows that cats throughout the bay allege that P stole their sound, slang and business model. The ice cream man is probably the most well-known instance, as noted below. There's just no way to say p came out with that term first and you certainly can't say that the luniz were unknown. Also, Richie Rich releases "Does G'z get to go the Heaven" in memory of pac. Moments later, P drops "Is there heaven for a gangsta." Also, the claims about signing pac seem dubious. He seemed to "borrow" alot of pac's style. Also, I remember watching 106 and Park (yeah, my bad) and seeing him tell free that he recorded with pac. She's asked what songs and he said "My Homies". Face, Pac and P are on that song but i dont think they recorded the song together. Face (the goat) released the verse well after pac died and put it on the song. Also, everyone knows the Bay pioneered the indepedent rap model. To his credit, P does generally acknowledge that he soaked up game in the bay. I would have liked to hear P address all this stuff and Paul usually asks the hard questions. If P's answer is simply, you can't trademark a concept then he is absolutely right, as a legal matter. Its why you can get Deep Impact and Armageddon coming out within months of each other. But the legal analysis is one thing,and the hiphop analysis is another. Is it hiphop to borrow so liberally from often much lesser known artists. I respect P's business mind and he definitely doubled down on the independent hustle by releasing an unrelenting stream of music. He basically challenged the convention that an artist just releases one album every yr or so. Dude was dropping albums non-stop. In the end, it hurt the quality but it changed the landscape. In a way, it was a precursor to dude dropping mixtapes in between albums -- fans want music and dont want to wait a year to get it. P hit this on the head. Btw, The Ghetto's Trying to Kill Me is certifiably dope and still holds up to this day. I'm not a P hater, I just think this could have been a really really interesting article if the author were free to do what he normally does. Aks the hard questions dx, you owe it to your fans and artists to allow them to tell us their ride.

    • NOLAson

      @thereal1, I'm with speak on this. I'm not a P hater by any stretch of the imagination. He put the N.O. on the map. Point blank. Alls I'm saying is that if you talk about "real" every other sentence, then be it. This was not a "real" interview.

    • thereal1

      if there was never a NO LIMIT RECORDS there would of Never Been a Cash Money, Master P put in the work for the city and got the world looking at the south. Master P started rapping when he moved to the bay, he gave the fanbase exactly what they wanted REAL street music. Yall need to give that ICE CREAM MAN shit up, the world No Master P as the ICE CREAM MAN and the Record is Beyon Better then anything the luniz dropped. All these so called people who said P stole they shit WHERE R THEY NOW? WHY WHERE THEY NOT AS SUCCESSFUL? Cause P KNOW HOW TO PUT DOWN A RECORD, HOW TO PROMOTE IT and HOW TO SERVE IT TO THE FANS. I GIVE P ALL THE RESPECT IN THE WORLD HE STILL DOING WHAT HE LOVE TO DO, AND HIS MUSIC TODAY IS JUST AS RELEVANT AS ANYONE ELSE and SOUNDS BETTER THEN ANY OTHER RAPPER WHO HAS RETURNED TO THE GAME. THAT JUST PROVES HOW GOOD AN ARTIST MASTER P IS. HE KNOWS HOW TO PUT TOGTHER THE TOTAL PACKAGE AND BE MORE THEN A ONE HIT WONDER. GIVE CREDIT WHERE IT DUE AND STOP REACHING MASTER P INSPIRED A GENERATION OF NEW HIP HOP HEADS THAT CAME FROM THE STREETS AND THE ONLY ONES HATIN P r THE ONES BROKE AND CANT FIGURE HOW TO GET THE RAP CAREER GOING.

  • Steven

    so he's a 'thug' again?

    • ghostofaldavis

      @thereal1 they was rappers dropin street music in the bay before P came along. Master-p was smart and droped a compulation with these Rappers Do you remember WestCoast Bad Boys?? What made P successful was he had a good production team Beats by the Pound were droping dope beats at the time. Master P showed people that the indpendent scene could make money and you didn't need to sign with the major lable, but selling tapes out the trunk and independent lable before him, or did anyone forget how Too $hort came up??? Eazy-E,E-40 and Rappen 4 ay also had the same vision by Master P just took it to another level.

  • Anonymous

    lol @ him getting mad at Mannie Fresh for saying No Limit bit off Cash Money and then saying I'm would see anyone who stole from me. Word? You stole The Ice Cream Man from Dru Down and The Luniz and Yukmouth dissed the fuck out of him for it. He stole a lot of shit from 2Pac as well. No Limit were a fad that is never going to see a resurgence. Alley Boy and Fat Trel are both mediocre, get the fuck outta here

  • D-NUCKS

    master p needs a stand out artist..that will anchor his label. None of them niggaz in that video above can do that...Master p can't do it...he don't rap good enough. He needs to keep searching for that artis. BABY got lil wayne..drake and nicki....Mater P...needs a certified spitta on his team....HE AIN;T GOT THAT

  • Anonymous

    i love that song "burbon n lacs" off Ghetto D and "ghetto love" MP Da Last Don classic shit if you ask me

  • Anonymous

    canadians took over hip hop. drake took over hiphop

    • YESSIR

      I wouldnt go that far. but this is the homothug/techno rap/booty music era. you gotta be borderline homo or overtly ignorant to blow up these days.

  • MASTA P

    MAKE EM SAY UHHHHH UHHHHH NA NA NA NA NA NA

  • BOUTITBOUTIT

    FUCK WIT MY NIGGA MASTER P AND YOU LEAVIN IN A BAG THAT GOES FOR THESE INTERNET NIGGAS TOO CP3 WE RIDE FOR THIS NIGGA REAL BOUT IT BOUIT IS A CP3 SLANG

  • Anonymous

    Master P is a hip-hop legend & his numbers speak for themselves. I personally, being a 90's baby, think Master P sucks as a rapper. But he seems like a genuine dude & obviously made some hit records dat the fans went out to support. Got nothing but respect for him. I just can almost nvr fuck with his music tho

  • Anonymous

    http://www.discogs.com/UNLV-Mac-Melph-Calio/master/290528 track 2 interviewer should do some research

  • joe

    `THIS IS THE CAT WHO DROP THE BAR IN HIP HOP ...COME ON SON. SILK THE SHOCKER WTF! ALL THAT GARBAGE HE WAS RELEASING YEA HE CHANGED THE GAME FUCKED HER MIND UP SO BAD.PUTTING ALL THAT COOKIE CUTTER SHIT OUT.PEOPLE BLAME SOLDIER BOY,MASTER P IS THE REASON SOLDIER BOYS EXIST!

    • Seriously...

      Another smart comment, I really am clueless as to why certain retards are calling Master P a legend now. For real, I think that if he didn't make the stupid dress/skateboard diss comment, people would still be making fun of him on this site. Seriously the community is fucking retarded as shit. The most backwards hypocritical retards ever, I think that if Justin Beiber were to say that "I think Drake is a faggot", they would be calling him a legend also.

  • joe

    THIS IS THE CAT WHO DROP BAR IN HIP HOP ...COME ON SON. SILK THE SHOCKER WTF! ALL THAT GARBAGE HE WAS RELEASING YEA HE CHANGED THE GAME FUCKED HER MIND UP SO BAD.PUTTING ALL THAT COOKIE CUTTER SHIT OUT.PEOPLE BLAME SOLDIER BOY,MASTER P IS THE REASON SOLDIER BOYS EXIST!

  • gblaze

    I am LMAO wondering why you think no lyric oh i mean hoe limit is even relevant in hip-hop!!! It is home of the wackest rappers in the History of HIP-HOP!!!!! They bit off of everyone!!! The cream man was the LUNIZ don't forget that you lame fucks!!! They have to be the shit stain of the industry! OH yeah Fuck you dumb ass simpleton fans of this shit stain of music! Oh yeah I ain't hating on the south if that is what your thinking!

    • Seriously...

      This is honestly the smartest post I've read on this article and on any Master P/No Limit article within the past two weeks.

  • TYBO2020

    SMH..THIS DUDE REARRANGING HIS STATEMENT TO STAY 'RELEVANT'IS NOT GOING TO HELP ANYTHING..YOU WACK AND BEEN WACK..AND STOP LYING WITH THAT "75 MILLION RECORDS" BULLSHIT TOO..EVEN KID ROCK QUESTIONED THAT SHIT ON POLITICALLY INCORRECT YEARS AGO..GO SELL SOMETHING..ELSE..

  • NOLAson

    I'm from New Orleans, grew up on P, and was proud of his, and No Limit's successes. P was a savvy business man. He got a deal by pressing and buying his own music, and the resulting SoundScans made the majors come calling. However, after reading this interview I finally understand something: in order to make it to the top you have to be DELUSIONAL. 1) Percy bit his ass off. Google "No Limit + Hot Boys". Not to cock ride Cash $, but everybody in the city knows who started that whole movement. He goes on to say that there were instances where someone took something he did and improved upon it, that's the game. But in the next breath he challenges Mannies' manhood about not stepping to him years ago? (-_-) C'mon son. 2) I agree with P's stance on personal accountability. There is little to be gained by blaming others for your problems. However, P's aforementioned business acumen was flawed. The No Limit sound eventually would eventually have worn out, but was hastened as the label over-saturated the market (with inferior product). That is directly attributable to P, but besides the point. The point is No Limit collapsed because of shrewd business practices. On my bookshelf is the April 1999 issue of The Source with P's brothers (Silkk Da Shocker & C-Murder) on the cover. In the cover story, they talk about keeping artists in line. Couple that with the fact that very few of P's artists owned anything (not even the houses they lived in), it was hard for the label to retain talent, which leads to my final point. 3) The people who helped P achieve success thought that this was a team effort. Hence Mia X's talk of familial ties. But this was business, and P. Miller was in the business of taking care of himself. His Beats By the Pound comment is an accurate self-portrayal. But the contention that Mystikal would have still been riding with P had the label not folded is absolutely ludicrous. Mysitkal left No Limit between 1998-2000. See Wikipedia. As I mentioned, No Limit was still relevant during that period. Mystikal left because he worked for a man who could careless about him. Snoop left for the same reason. Why do you think his final album with the label is titled "The Last Meal"? But if you wanna keep it street, the interviewer should have asked Master P about Soulja Slim. Magnolia "Soulja" Slim. *** All of this withstanding, P admonishes others for "trying to sell newspapers" (when is the last time you bought a newspaper?), while encouraging realness. Yet, he does that very thing with this article. But I digress. Much of this piece is fraught with inconsistencies and contradictions. For once, just once, I wish I could read an interview in which a man of P's stature could convey the flat out truth about successes and failures without the posturing, in an effort to educate. That's what real men do. They educate the young ones.

    • thereal1

      at Nolason U 100% wrong on everything you said, u think posting this long our message its just becomes the truth? lets start from bottom and up. Soulja Slim made alot of money off p, enough to change his life, unfornatally he didnt. Snoop Dogg "Last Meal" Was talking about death row and other labels eating off him, P gave Snoop the money to star DOGGHOUSE records and gave snoop all his profit to this day P and Snoop and good friends (see any snoop interview on radio show wshh. Mystikal contract was up and mystikal wanted to do his own thing he didnt just leave, he wanted to take his stab as his own boss and started his own label that got picked up by jive. (see mystikal interview last week on him and p back in studio) - Beats by the pound wanted more more more, yet p wanted a diffrent sound with the changing times, Mia X had some family issues and stepped out of music she never finshed he last album, and still has not dropped a retail album sice then. 3) P has given plenty of people from the streets a chance and a job, and plenty of artist from snoop, fiend, curren$y and so on will to you they made alot of money with p. Another note alot of the rappers on the label where real street dudes, alot didnt carry the same work ethic and p, and alot staid in the street game and got caught up or killed. No limit ran the show for 3 years straight, until 2001, univesal dumped a million in Cashmoney, and then the majors merged in 2001 and bought up all the radio stations, stoping any other Master P's from ever making the indie success like P did. Until Soulja Boy with the internet no indie artist made it P Big #fact. And Im from New Orleans live the no limit era, P was saying hot boy in his records and his richond records years before unlv or cash money, master p was sayin big tymers years before cash money. and if you belive BOUT IT BOUT IT came from unlv bout this record you my friend our DEliusional. NO Limit dropped records every tuesday, sold over 30 million records in 1 year, had over 10 billboard #1 and 50 Billbord top 10 with no radio or tv support. But all that said, give respect where its trully due MASTER P is a legened for his blue print, first man to do alot of thing in this game, to many to list. This entire interview was meant to be negative from the jump and really talked nothing about his new movement me i wouldnt waste my time explaining my self when the world already know who TRU 2 DA GAME.

  • BLACK

    YO MASTER P TAKING OVER THE GAME RIGHT NOW SONS!!!

  • Anonymous

    master p is whack bring back the real stop rembering the whack hiphop has to go forward we need a new lyricsist one whos better than nas

  • 6Minutz

    P is definitely a pioneer--especially from the standpoint of Southern Hip Hop. He made millions out of very little, so he's a smart businessman. And his music was hot back then. That being said, he probably knows the odds of what he's trying to do right now. But he might make it work. We just have to wait and see I guess.

  • Typical fag DX poster

    I LOVE MASTER P!!!HE'S A LEGEND!HIS COCK IS LEGEND!I HATED HIM A FEW MONTHS AGO, BUT I'M SO BACKWARDS AND STUPID THAT HE'S A LEGEND NOW!HE TALKED SHIT ABOUT DRESSES AND SKATEBOARD?!?!?MY GOD THE MAN IS A LEGEND! LET'S KEEP SAYING HIS MUSIC IS AWESOME GUYS! WHEN IN ALL REALITY IT WAS TRASH!!!REMEMBER THE 504 BOYS? GAME FACE? THIS DUDE IS STREET, REMEMBER HOW STREET HE WAS IN LIL' ROMEO'S SHOW?!?!? OR HOW HE WENT WITH CLEAN RAPS TO TRY AND GET HIS MONEY BACK!?!?!? MAN THIS DUDE IS A FUCKING LEGEND! I LOVE BOYS!

    • Typical fag DX poster

      YOU ARE A GENIUS!!! JUST LIKE MASTER P!!! YOU READ EVERYTHING I WROTE AND CAME TO THE RIGHT CONCLUSION THAT I'M A FAG!!!! RIGHT ON MAN! LET'S LISTEN TO GAME FACE BECAUSE IT'S LEGENDARY!!!!!! HOW ABOUT "OOH WEE" WHERE THE LEGEND P, RHYMES THAT ILL NURSERY RHYME ABOUT MARY AND HER BIG OL' BUTT?!?!?! CRAZY ILL SHIT MAN!!!! P IS THE LEGEND OF OUR TIME!

    • Anonymous

      you really are a fag

  • Anonymous

    It's hard to believe Master P had the success he did. It was a nice run, and some of the music back then still sounds ok today. I doubt his comeback will amount too much, especially without his former lineup, but as long as he's not broke or doing life like C, there's really no risk.

  • Edubb

    Great interview. Big ups to P!!

  • Anonymous

    make another black history rap that's what the streets wanna hear

  • Money First

    Some of the things he said were right and some were DEAD WRONG! Its cool tho' much respect for P but he approached it like the streets only and not like the corporate business he should have. You secure your assets as a businessmen at all times...you learn to create good product and adapt to actually running a record label in the tradition of running one (not whats happening today) but artist development and growth!

  • Anonymous

    Awesome interview, Big ups to a person handling his business and not twitter, instagram and face book ranting.

  • Chi-Ill

    Solute to P! Great interview! Keeping it trill as always!

  • interessant

    That was the best Master P interview I've ever read. I liked him more once I started feelin' sorry for him. Kinda made me laugh, his lil' pot-shot at "how many records Fiend sell now?" Ha. He fucked up though, with that Beats By The Pound mistake. I hated that music, but it got way worse without them, while CMR had Mannie.

  • Daddy

    Master P helped change the game with regards to the music business. I wasn't ever a fan of his rhymes then and now but Beats By The Pound were amazing. Props to Paul W Arnold for conducting this interview well, as always.